April 1, 1850 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Sr.

April 1, 1850

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Hiram Crawford Sr., Dowagiac, MI

Hiram is writing a brief letter to his daughter, Sarah, to let her know that they have arrived safely in Dowagiac and had settled in with their son, Edwin, although it is a little cramped. He goes on to describe the village and its prospects for growth along the Central Railroad line. He tells Sarah that “morals are low her but the place is new and good society will come in with the growth of the place.”

Dowagiac April 1st 1850

Dear Daughter

We are well. We got here with our household goods safe although L and Hiram[1] had rather a tough time of it. We are as comfortably situated as we expected. We are in with Edwin[2] a leettle crowded with our goods but otherwise room enough. Edwin has got as pleasent a situation as is in this place. The Village itself is a handsome situation as can be well found, high and dry with every prospect of being one of the first villages on the line of the Central Railroad.[3] The country is rich and productive around it. There has been an immense quantity of grain and other produce sent from this station the past winter and even now hundreds of bushels of grain and potatoes are brought in dayly to be sent off. You see how my hand trembles. I am in a great hurry two this morning so you must excuse me from writing a long letter. Write as soon as you can. Let us know how the boys get along, ours here are as contented as pigs. Mother[4] is we[ll?] contented living here. The only drawback to it is being seperated from you and the boys and also her religious privilages in Galesburg. Morals are low her but the place is new and good society will come in with the growth of the place. But my time is up so your Parents say God bless you our dear child and your Husband[5] for your sake and his own.

Compliments to all  

Hiram Crawford

——-

[1] Lucius Prosper & Hiram, Jr., Hiram’s two youngest children

[2] Edwin W. Crawford, Hiram’s son

[3] Dowagiac was platted when the Michigan Central came through in 1848 to establish a route from Detroit to Niles, Michigan; the village was incorporated in 1858, growing to becoming a city in 1877

[4] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford  

[5] Charles Luke Keith Jr.

3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Trackback: Updates & Corrections | Crawford/Comfort Family Letters
  2. Trackback: April 1, 1850 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Sr. – Letters to and from the Keith and Related Families
  3. Trackback: Corrections and Additions – Letters to and from the Keith and Related Families

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