April 24, 1882 letter to Sarah Keith from Louese Harris

April 24, 1882

To: Sarah Keith

From: Louese Harris, Phoenix, MI

 Louese Harris is describing their trip to their new home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by way of Chicago, shortly after her marriage to Daniel (D.D.) Harris.

1882-04-24 1882-04-24B 1882-04-24C 1882-04-24D

Phoenix Apr 24/82

Dear Ma

After leaving Galesburg[1] arrived at Kal[2] waited for the express came through to Chicago. Found no one at the depot. Went up to Uncle Hi’s[3], found them expecting us. Rec’d the postal that afternoon. They were very much surprised to hear that we could not stay longer than Wed eve. Jess Lil & Ida Hudson spent the afternoon with me. Ida & I called on Carrie Stray. Walt came down after work & he & Jess stayed to tea then went to the depot with us. Will & Joe Hayward called a few moments.

Got my album it was all right. Uncle Hi invited D[4] to go to dinner with him that day so he did not get back to see the girls until four o’clock. Did not see Uncle Pros[5] or any of his family. He is running on the cable now. Aunt Bell[6] & the children[7] are going to Omro to live in their house they own there. (We rec’d no presents there) Aunt Kate[8] said if I had told them just when I was going to be married[9] they would have sent me something. We left Chicago Wed eve at 9.5. arrived at Ishpeming the next after noon at 2.30. Put up at the Nelson house which affords first class accommodations. It is a nicer looking building than any hotels in Kal.

Ishpeming is a pleasant place & lively. Left there Friday morn at 8 o’clock. Arrived to L’anse just before noon. Had to stay there until Sat morning then took the stage for Houghton. We were from 8 in the morning until 6 at night getting through. Of all the roads I ever saw those were the worst. The wheels were into the mud up to the hubs half of the time. If it was’nt mud it was water or sand. Thought we’d tip over every minute. Part of the time we would ride around rocks where it would be right straight up on one side & down hundreds of ft. on the other. I’d think of home when we come to such places. Well we got through all right. Staid at Hancock over night. Han– & Houghton are beautiful places. The river only divides them. There are as nice residences there as they have in Kal on their prettiest street and it is so full of business every one is on the go. Left Hancock yesterday morning by rail road. Arrived at Calumet at 1.30 then came over there by stage. Part of the way we rode over fearful large snow drifts then again the road would be bare. There is scarcely no snow here at Phoenix only a few spots on the cliffs. We got here yesterday after one I believe. Of course they were all glad to see us. Can’t tell how I’ll like the Brockways but think I’ll like Albert & Mrs Scott. We have a room up stairs in Mrs Scott’s house. I’ve been over to the store twice to day. They have a nice store frame building & a good stock of goods. Brock– house is furnished quite well but no upholstered furniture excepting a couch & lounging chair. They keep a girl. She has done my washing to day. The boys turned up last night to let us know that they would be on hand to night so I expect we’ll have a homing. I’m going home with Bess Farwell to get away from it. Do not know whether D will come up or not. My trunk looks very bad. They knocked a hole in the top of it & it is banged up all over. Does not look very much like my trunk.

Sallie (Mrs Scott) gave me a silk tidy[10] this morning. It is real pretty. Will tell you how it is made in my next. Hav’nt been homesick yet but know I shall be[11]. Good Bye. Write soon

[1] Louese’s husband, D.D. Harris, was a merchant and they were moving up to Phoenix, Michigan, to clerk a store in that area

[2] Kalamazoo, Michigan

[3] Hiram Crawford Jr.

[4] Louese’s husband, Daniel D. Harris, who was referred to as D.D. or D.

[5] Lucius Prosper Crawford

[6] Pros’ wife, Isabella (Steele) Crawford

[7] Leo, Byron, Ernest and Albert Crawford

[8] Hiram’s wife, Katherine (Atchinson) Crawford

[9] They were married April 12, 1882

[10] A tidy could be either a decorative protective covering for the arms or headrest of a chair or a receptacle that holds odds and ends (as sewing materials)

[11] Apparently Louese cried every night and after just 18 months, they moved back to Shelbyville where D.D. opened a general store and also served as postmaster

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