May 11, 1902 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

May 11, 1902

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Sarah mistakenly sent a letter intended for Hiram to Amanda. Amanda was shocked at first because she thought Sarah was writing D.C. and had forgotten about his death. D.C. died a little over a year ago and Amanda misses him very much.

Scan of 1902-05-11 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden May 11th, 1902

My dear Sister

I feel sure you intended this letter for Hiram[1] and perhaps sent the one you wrote to me to him. However, I was very glad to hear from you even in this way. It shocked me at first as I thought you were writing to D.C.[2] and had forgotten. O Sarah, it is a little over a year. He died on the first day of May. I can hardly realize yet that he is gone never to return. O it is so lonely without him. There is no lonelyness so great as to loose ones companion. He was such a dear good husband and we loved each other so. We were always lovers.

We are all quite well and busy. Harold[3] is such a comfort and Ida[4] is a good girl but away so much of the time. With love to yourself and all the family.

Amanda

——-

[1] Hiram Crawford Jr.

[2] David Caleb Crawford

[3] Harold V. Crawford, Amanda’s youngest child

[4] Ida Louise Crawford, Amanda’s eldest child

February 16, 1902 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

February 16, 1902

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Ida and Harold are both well. She has not been very well this winter. Had to work so much harder than ever before and misses her darling husband so much. Ida is engaged to a young student attending the university there and works in her office of County Superintendent of Schools. Everybody says she makes a good officer.

Scan of 1902-02-16 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden, Feb 16th 1902[1]

My dear Sister Sarah,

I recieved your dear letter and was very glad to hear from you. Ida and Harold[2] are both well. I have not been very well this winter, have been miserable nearly all the time. I have had to work so much harder than I ever did before and at my age,[3] it comes rather hard on me. I miss my darling husband[4] so much. Yes, I can sympathize with poor Nancy[5] and know how she suffers. Isent is strange that her husband and mine died so near and in appearently the same manner. I have thought of it so many times and they were such dear good husbands.

Our children of course are dear to us, but they soon have lives of their own and then if Father is gone, Mother is alone.

Harold is a nice good boy and loves his mother dearly. He is such a comfort to me. Ida is engaged to a young student[6] attending the university here and of course her attention is taken up with him. She is in her office of County Superintendent[7] and she makes a good officer so every body says. Sarah, I recieved a letter from brother Robert,[8] but I could not make out the address. Will you please send it to me so that I may write him. I am sorry that I have not done so before this. I want to answer all the good letters that I have recieved. Am slow but try to be sure about that anyway.

Give my love to all of your family. You know I may not remember all their names and tell Nancy that her Aunt knows more than any one else how lonely her life is. Am glad to hear from you at anytime you can write me. With love to yourself.

I am your sister Amanda[9]

——-

[1] The stationery and envelope had a black border, which was used when there had been a death in the family

[2] Amanda’s children

[3] Amanda was 50 at the writing of this letter

[4] Amanda’s husband and Sarah’s brother, David Caleb “D.C.” Crawford, died May 1, 1901 at the age of 65

[5] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown, whose husband, Henry Brown, died May 22, 1901 at the age of 50

[6] This may be referring to Jack Kelly, whom Ida married May 14, 1904

[7] Ida was the County Superintendent of Schools for Jefferson County, Colorado

[8] Robert Crawford, Amanda’s brother-in-law and Sarah’s brother

[9] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford

(This post was updated on 05-15-2021)

May 19, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Robert Crawford

May 19, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Robert Crawford, Neenah, WI

Robert is writing Sarah in response to the news of D.C.’s death. Robert went to visit his daughter Lulu who is to be married in July. He is helping his son-in-law on the farm.

1901-05-19 Robert Crawford to Sarah Keith

Neenah, May 19″, 1901

Dear Sister Sarah,

I read you letter hastily & Papers[1] announcing the Death of our dear Brother DC Crawford.[2] It was quite unexpected to me and very sad news. I deeply sympathize with his wife,[3] her son[4] & daughters[5] in this great affliction but it is my dear sister that comes to us all. I can hardly realize Sarah that DC is dead. I have not met him in 25 years and he has not written to me in 3 or 4 years but that is his way business of course. I dont have any unpleasant feelings that way. I read Amanda letter by the way of Henry.[6] It is very sad. Poor woman. I have written to her a letter of condolence & sympathy. I will return to you Sister the Paper & Statement and letter of DC death.

We are all usually well. My work on the River will not commence till in July some time owing to the drought. It keeps the Logs back. I shall not get till in Oct next perhaps. We have not had any frost yet to hurt fruit but it is quite cool this morning. I was down to see Lulu[7] last Sunday. Her School will close in 3 weeks. She expects to be married in July[8] if she dont change her mind in regard to it. I am helping my son in law[9] on the farm some. He is going to put in 2 acres of tomatoes for a canning factory. Good bye for this time Sister dear. Regards & love to you all.

Brother Robert

Robt Crawford

—–

[1] Unfortunately the whereabouts of the “Papers” is unknown and an online search has not yet come up with D.C.’s obituary

[2] David Caleb Crawford

[3] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford

[4] Harold Valentine Crawford

[5] D.C. only had one living daughter, Ida (Crawford) Kelley; two daughters died in infancy/childhood

[6] Henry Clay Crawford, Robert’s brother

[7] His daughter, Lulu Crawford

[8] Lulu married Edward Witte on July 18, 1901

[9] Jackson Tullar, the second husband of Robert’s daughter, Edna (Crawford) Henry Tullar

(This post was updated on 2-18-2021)

May 15, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Jr.

May 15, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Chicago, IL

Hiram is responding to Sarah’s news of D.C.’s death. He had sent a letter to Robert and had received a copy of D.C.’s obituary from Henry. He has sent condolences to Amanda.

Scan of 1901-05-15 Hiram Crawford to Sarah Keith

Anthracite-Bituminous Coal Co.
Miners and Dealers in Coal.

Chicago, May 15, 1901

My Dear Sister

Your letter with the sad news of our Brothers death[1] reached me Saturday morning. It was a great shock to me for somehow I hadent thought of DC passing away. He was a strong active man and was comparatively young amongst old people. I feel it probably more than the rest of the boys for we being so near the same age.[2] All during our boyhood and young manhood when we could be together we were very chummy. He ought to have lived ten or fifteen years longer and undoubtedly would if he had taken care of himself. No one ought to fool with the grip[3] or pneumonia. When he does he practically commits suicide. Well, Sarah, our circle has been broken for the first time in a good many years.[4] We have stood at a half of a dozen for a good while. May we stand at five[5] for many years yet. But we are like the grand army. We are at that age when we must expect these events to naturally happen a little oftener. It is the fate of the human family and we must take it as it comes and as philosophical as we can.

I wrote to Amanda[6] as soon as I got your letter expressing my condolences and sympathy as best I could and asked her to write. I also wrote Robert.[7] Amanda must have sent Henry[8] a paper and perhaps written him for I received a South Bend paper with the obituary in exactly as it was in the Denver paper you sent me, which by the way I gave to Nancy[9] last Sunday. I shall however write Henry today and send him Amanda’s letter with directions to return it to you. We are all as well as usual. Received a letter from Blanche[10] yesterday. She was well and happy. I mail you some chop today. Please let me know if you receive it. Love to all

Affectionately your Brother

H Crawford

215 Dearborn St

——-

[1] David Caleb Crawford, who went by the nickname of D.C.

[2] Hiram was two years younger than D.C.

[3] Grippe, another name for mild influenza which was an upper respiratory infection caused by a virus and associated with running nose, sore throat and cough, temperature elevation and aches and pains throughout the body

[4] Their brother James died in 1858 and brother Edwin died in 1866

[5] Sarah, Robert, Henry, Hiram and Prosper

[6] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[7] Their brother, Robert Crawford

[8] Their brother, Henry Clay Crawford

[9] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown

[10] Hiram’s youngest daughter, Blanche (Crawford) Hessey

(This post was updated on 02-18-2021)

May 5, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

May 5, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Amanda is writing to Sarah to inform her of D.C.’s death and the circumstances leading up to it.

Scan of 1901-05-05 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden, May 5th

My dear Sister and Brothers,

My heart is to heavy to say much but I am in duty bound to tell you of my loss. My husband is dead.[1] He has been sick with bad cold for some six weeks, was home most of the time for last three weeks but would not give up and was in Denver all of the last week attending to his business affairs. I tried to have him come home but he said he was not sick enough. I was with him evry other day and heard from him evry day. He would not go to bed and I did not realize how bad he was. I was with him all day on Monday and Tuesday he expected to return to Cripple Creak, but did not and on Tuesday evening sent for me and I went down on early train expecting him to meet me, but as he did not I went to his room and found my darling unconscious. He revived and knew me once or twice but did not know Ida.[2] We were both with him all day until the end. I had left Harold[3] at home and he did not know of his father’s death until next day. Oh, how can I ever stand it. My poor darling. We loved each other so and he always lived for and loved his little family. As I do not know the address of either of the boys[4] so please forward this letter to them or let them know of their Brother’s death. Ida has sent the papers to you also. My poor dear husband is at rest and sleeps by the side of his two little babies Allie and Mamie[5] at Riverside Denver.

In sorrow,

Your Sister

Amanda

——-

[1] David Caleb (D.C.) Crawford, was 65 years old at the time of his death on May 1, 1901

[2] Ida Louise (Crawford) Kelly, Amanda’s daughter

[3] Harold “Doc” Crawford, Amanda’s son

[4] D.C. had four brothers still living at the time of his death: Robert, Henry, Hiram and Lucius Prosper “Pros” Crawford

[5] Both daughters died in early childhood

(This post was updated on 02-13-2021)

December 7, 1899 letter to Luke & Sarah Keith from D.C. Crawford

December 7, 1899

To: Luke & Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: D.C. Crawford, Cripple Creek, CO

Speaks of their Golden Wedding Anniversary. The great Cripple Creek fire put him in a financial bind. Before the fire his income was $30 a day clear. All outstanding accounts were valueless and there was no business for over two years. His family lives in Golden. They lived in Cripple Creek for three years but the cost was too high. Ida is teaching school at Fort Collins. Amanda and his son, who he thinks will be nine on February 14, are at home. A handwritten note on the envelope reads “Uncle D. C. Crawford’s last letter to Ma.”

1899-12-07A 1899-12-07B 1899-12-07C 1899-12-07D 1899-12-07E 1899-12-07env

Cripple Creek, Dec 7, 1899

Dear Brother and Sister
Galesburg, Mich.

When I opened my Box at the P.O. and tore open the wrapper exposing a newspaper and I read the word Galesburg, I commenced to hunt for items and was pleasantly surprised when I read of your “Golden Wedding Anniversary”[1]. Surely it must have been a joyful meeting of so many of you under the old homestead roof and to one and all must brought to mind many many of the reminiscences of by gone days at the eventful time full of the joys and hopes of youth. I note all were present except H. L. Keith[2] and James[3] – that was to be regreted as on such an occasion all should have tried hard to have been present. I would liked to have been present myself. Well, My Dear relatives we are getting along in years and these reunions should be encouraged as it brings us together, renews our friendships so to speak as we are apt to become unmindful of each other when long separated as in my own persenal experence. I do not know just when but has been years since we have exchanged letters. Why simply because we just neglected it. Other cares and duties have daily taken up all of our time (and absent friends and relatives have been to a certain extent almost forgotten.) This should not be, yet I am “guilty”. My time for past ten years has been almost incessently taken up. The great Cripple Creek Fire put me in such a financial shape that my whole time was taken up to exist for along time after the fire. At the time of the fire my income was about $30.00 per day clear and all outstanding accounts were valuless and there was no business for over 2 years. We are experencing better times but nothing to compare (at that time). While this is a great mining camp there are a great many poor people here. We have to put forth the same effort to make a dollar here as elsewhere. My family do not live here. They live at Golden, Colo. They lived here for three years but little to high here and having a home there, and Ida[4] is teaching school at Fort Collins 75-miles beyond Golden. (Amanda[5] and the Boy[6], who is coming 9-years of age, I believe February 14th are at home and Ida and myself are out restling for bread and butter. Of course, I would be very glad to see you all. Yet, I cannot promise that I can. “Darne fortune” has all to say about it. I find the battle of live much harder task in last twenty years then previous to that. Many a lucky fellow has made fortunes here but think of the thousands that expended their little all and went hungry and walked out of camp while his more fortunate Brother rides in and out in Palace cars. Now that I have commenced, I must write to Brother Robert[7] and Brother Hiram[8]. Both have written me and I do not quite remember if I have answered either of them. As stated, I am getting quite advanced in years and cannot move around as in former years. Yet I do get around all right and have the name of being the leivliest man of my age on the street. I will enclose one of my pictures as I look now. Well in conclusion will say that please remember me kindly to all the children and their parents, both present and absent. I had forgotten Louis[9] husbands Name. I note now Mrs Skinner[10] and her son C I Clark, wife[11] & 3 children[12]. He has done well, very nice man. He was with us awhile. Well dear Luke and Sarah, may God continue to bless you and yours and if it is our destiny never to meet on the shores of time may we hope to meet in the great hereafter if it be the will of him who doeth all things well.[13]

Your loving Brother

D.C. Crawford[14]

Box 34

——-

[1] Sarah Crawford & Charles Luke Keith Jr. were married November 14, 1849 in Comstock Township, Michigan

[2] Henry Keith, Luke’s son by his first wife, Minerva Payson

[3] James Keith, Sarah and Luke’s son

[4] Ida (Crawford) Kelley, D.C.’s eldest daughter

[5] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[6] Harold Valentine Crawford, D.C.’s son

[7] Robert Crawford

[8] Hiram Crawford

[9] Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner, Luke’s daughter by his first wife, Minerva Payson

[10] Lois’ second husband was Adelbert Skinner

[11] Charles Ira and Clara (Youngs) Clark. Charles was Lois’ son by her first husband, Byron Clark

[12] Edna, Ethan & Charles Clark

[13] There is a note on the envelope that this was Uncle D.C. Crawford’s last letter to Ma

[14] David Caleb Crawford

March 15, 1881 letter to Sarah Keith from D.C. Crawford

March 15, 1881

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: D.C. Crawford, Alma, CO

D.C. writes that he is extremely busy with operations in several districts and headquarters in Alma. He is expecting to run for County Clerk in the fall. He is glad to hear that Mother is living with Sarah. Amanda and Ida are living in Golden and Eugene’s wife is in Chicago. Eugene is prospecting in Gunnison County.

1881-03-15 1881-03-15B 1881-03-15env

Alma Mch 15th 1881

Dear Sister

I am almost ashamed to write you yet I know my letter will be welcome. I am one of the busiest mortels living. I am in the Mining and Brokerage business operating in sevral Districts but make my head quarters here. I am expecting to engage in Politics this fall by running for County Clerk and Recorder of this County of Park. The office is worth some $6000.00 per year. If I get it I can hold it for four (4) years at least.

I am so glad Mother[1] is with you and I will do all in my power to assist you both. Please write me how you all are commencing with Luke[2]. We are all quite well. Amanda[3] & Ida[4] are in the Valley at Golden & Denver visiting until May. Eugene[5] wife[6] is in Chicago & my wifes sister[7] that has lived with us for several years returned to her home in Utah Territory at Telluride[8]. Her Father[9] moved there several years a go.

Eugene is prospecting and working some mines this Spring. He expects to engage in some business at or in Gunssin Co in this State commencing about May 1st.

Ida is attending school this winter for the first time. If she lives will be 8 years old in May next.

Please write soon. With love to you all not forgetting our Mother.

From your Brother

“D C” Crawford

——-

[1] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford Betts

[2] Charles Luke Keith Jr., Sarah’s husband

[3] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[4] Ida Crawford, D.C.’s daughter

[5] Eugene Crawford, the son of D.C. and Sarah’s late brother Edwin

[6] Minnie (Crooks) Crawford

[7] Sarah (Thornton) Jameson

[8] The city appears to be Telluride, although Telluride was in Colorado, not Utah Territory

[9] Christopher Thornton

March 23, 1877 letter to Sarah Keith from D.C. Crawford

March 23, 1877

To:  Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: D.C. Crawford, Denver, CO

D.C. is writing to inform Sarah about the death of his daughter, Allie. There had been a great deal of scarlet fever and diphtheria and he feels that the doctors did not appreciate the seriousness of Allie’s case until it was too late. He then writes about the difficulties that people encounter when they “go away from old and tried Friends and places made dear by associations for new and untried Fields & Friends.” Many do well but thousands lose all they have and have to endure many hardships. Many who have tried farming in Colorado are so poor and hundreds are flocking to the Black Hills. If he had not been elected Auditor, he probably would have “gone on a wild goose chase somewhere either to California or Black Hills.”

1877-03-23 1877-03-23B 1877-03-23C 1877-03-23D 1877-03-23env

D.C. Crawford
State of Colorado
Auditor’s Office

Denver, March 23d 1877

Dear Sister

Your most welcome leter reached me in conjuntion with Mothers[1]. You may be assured we were very happy to receiv them as they brought words of consolation from those whom we knew wrote them in no meaningless way, but emenated from hearts brim full of heartfelt feeling and sympathy in this our time of sore tribulation and great trial. Still we feel that Providence knows best how to deal with His Earthly Children for their good and therefore we bow in submission in this affliction that He has seen fit to bring upon us. Trusting in His Wisdem and Goodness for consolation in this our seemingly irreparable loss our little darling Allie[2]. She was a sweet child and just beginning to be so interesting. She was very pretty and affectionate, always with me evenings and of course I miss her very much. With her mother[3] of course she is in her thoughts all of the time as she is reminded of her all of the time as she was in her mind continually being with her all of the time. Our little Ida[4] keeps speaking about her little sister having gone to Heaven and is now a little angel. There has been a great deal of sickness about here with children Scarlet Fever & Diptheria prevaile alarmingly. I presume however you have such diseases with you only in a more aggravated State our Diseases of such a character are generally handled by our physicians but in the case of our Baby it seems as though they did not understand her case or did not think she was so sick until it was to late. I never have been sick to speak of since I had the Typhoid Fever at Galesburgh[5] when a boy. Except sick head ache I have been troubled with that for years. I sometimes I think I inherited it from Mother as she has been more or less troubled with her stomach for years. Dear Sister I deeply feel for poor Ethen[6]. Poor boy. He must be very miserable with such poor health & Luke[7] also. I am so sorry for both of them and you to. You must have it hard at times. I hardly know how to advise. I know Luke and you must feel greatly discouraged but the question arises where can you go to better yourselves. Most every man that has tried Farming in Colorado has made a loosing thing of it. The great majority of them are so poor that they cannot get away and are ekeing out a miserable exestince. Hundreds are flocking to the “Black Hills” country. No doubt some will do well but Thousands will loose all they have in the world and all will have to suffer many hardships. Many will be murdered and hundreds will be killed by Indians. With me I am inclined to the opinion that as a general thing People are foolish to go away from old and tried Friends and places made dear by associations for new and untried Fields & Friends. I have witnessed it in this county so much where People have come amongst us seemingly well to do and after several years having elapsed they have become disheartened living out in some by way place trying to farm. “Hoppers”[8] eat them out of house & home. No neighbors near for generally sickness & misfortune overtake them an after having exhausted their means are obliged to leav the country and not an uncomm thing have to procur means from friends at home to get away. This of course is not so in every case because some do well anywhere but the great majority are living from hand to mouth in this country and especially during the past few years as it has been extremely dull. We hear of rich strikes now and then in the mines but when you go there its a “humbug” often. (Not always) as there are some rich mines here. I have a friend visiting with me for a few days from the mines that has lived in this country as long as I have & mined all of the time & cannot pay his debts today & been in a good Mining District all of the time & so it goes. I used to think I would be well off sometime but have about given that up as the time for making money is gone past here. That is to make it big speculation as this country has assumed something like the condition of the states when I lived there & of course you know about how things are here. If I had not been elected[9] I should have gone on a wild goose chase somewhere either to California or “Black Hills.” Love to you all in which we all join. Pleas say to Mother I shall write soon.

Your Bro. D.C. Crawford

[1] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford Betts

[2] Allie Crawford, who was about two years old

[3] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford

[4] D.C.’s eldest child, who was approximately four years old at the time

[5] D.C. was born in Canada. The family left Canada in the early 1840s with the intention of settling in the Grand Rapids area, but were forced to stop in Galesburg, Michigan when D.C. developed Typhoid Fever

[6] The eldest son of Sarah and Luke Keith

[7] Charles Luke Keith Jr., Sarah’s husband

[8] Grasshoppers

[9] D.C. was the first Auditor of the newly formed State of Colorado. His picture now hangs in the State Capitol building

September 23, 1876 letter to Nancy Betts from D. C. Crawford

September 23, 1876

To:  Nancy Betts

From: D.C. Crawford,  Colorado Springs, CO

D.C. is proprietor of the Crawford House in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and has been nominated as State Auditor for the upcoming election. Amanda is quite well but not strong as she is still nursing her baby.

CRAWFORD HOUSE

D.C. CRAWFORD,

PROPRIETOR.

Colorado Springs, Col., Sept 23, 1876[1]

Dear Mother

I have not heard from you for sometime and have been so busy during the final campaign that I have not taken time to do anything outside of the regular routine of business appertaining to my office and Hotel business. On next Teusday is the day of Election, Oct. 3. If I should be successful I shall go out of the Hotel business pretty soon, if not I shall probably not for the present, but close my present place of business and take the management of a large House at Pueblo on a salary as then I would know what I was doing.

Dear Mother, I have been honored with the nomination of Auditor of the New State on Rep ticket as above stated. I think I shall be elected. This leavs us all quite well. The children[2] are much better then ever before. Amanda[3] is quite well but not strong as she is nursing her baby[4] yet. Will wean her soon she says. We are having quite a nice season, but very dull for Colerado. The Centennial has done us a great deal of injury I think then the Grashoppers have taken a large portion of the crops, especially the late crops. Keeps everybody hard up. This is the poorest place to farm in, in the world I guess as we have to depend on artificial means for water. We have rains but not just as we need them. Also about every year we are visited with the grasshopper–pest. Love to you dear Mother and all of sister’s[5] family. Your Son

D.C. Crawford

P.S. I herewith Enclose Five dollars. If you need some take a part of it and give bal. to Sarah or all just as you can or think best. I am pretty hard up just now and will send some more just as soon as I can. D.C.C.

(In margin on front of letter:) Dear Mother – I have written to you but have no time to write to Sister. Now I will direct to Sister as if you are not at home. Sister can read it an send it to you. D.C.C.

——-

[1] While the date on the letter looks like it is 1878, D.C. refers to the upcoming election of October 3, where he was running for the office of auditor, and that election was in 1876. From Nevada, Colorado and Wyoming – 1890, by Hubert Howe Bancroft, regarding the election of October 3, 1876: David C. Crawford was a native of Canada, moved to Mich. and Wis., and in 1860 came to Colorado. He first engaged in mining in Gilpin and Boulder counties, in 1862 in merchandising in Park co., and in 1865 in farming in Jefferson co. He was elected clerk and recorder for the latter county in 1867, and afterward opened a real estate office and insurance office, becoming in 1875 proprietor of the Crawford house at Colorado Springs. He married Amanda J Thornton of Golden. His opponent for the office of auditor was J. F. Benedict, whom he beat by 922 votes

[2] Ida and Allie Crawford

[3] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[4] Allie Crawford

[5] Sarah (Crawford) Keith

February 6, 1876 letter to Sarah Keith from D.C. Crawford

February 6, 1876

To:  Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: D.C. Crawford, Colorado Springs, CO

David is sitting up with his little daughter Ida, who has been very sick for five weeks. David is running a hotel but Amanda does not like the business and so he may sell it in the spring or fall.

1876-02-06 1876-02-06B 1876-02-06env
CRAWFORD HOUSE
D.C. Crawford, Proprietor.

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Feb 6th 1876

My Dear Sister

In looking over my old letters this evening I came on one of yours not reccollecting if I had answered it and having a little time I placed myself in position to drop you a few lines trusting you are all usually well. At this moment I am sitting up with my little daughter “Ida” going on three years old I think her Mother said in May[1]. Its six oclock in the morning. Everyone is asleep in bed. I take the watch with her from one oclock every night. She has been sick for five (5) weeks in the morning (Sunday) commenced in her bowels information. At times thought she was dead. Three physicians having given her up but kept to work on her and finally succeeded in returning her to life. We of course all feel very grateful to human as well as Providential aid in saving to us our first born. She is getting along quite well still slowly as she cannot walk yet owing in fact that the docters used a hollow instrument to perforate the skin & injected some poisonous substance under the skin in the region of her heart that made two bad running sores & of course makes her sore & weak. Amanda[2] and Baby[3] are quite well. Baby has been more or less fretful with her teeth. I am keeping a hotel and have the reputation for going very well. Still Amanda does not like it much & I may not remain at it very long. Perhaps not longer than Spring or Fall. Amanda does not have to work much only oversee as its quite a large house & we have to keep so much help any way. Letters from Mother[4] & Hiram[5] & Henry[6] lately state all well as usual. Hiram says his Family paid you all a visit & had a good time the going after them. I believe if I was rich I would do the same. Write soon. We all join in love to you all.

From your Bro. D.C. Crawford

Say to Luke[7] I have not forgotten him but will send him a paper some day. I hope Ethen[8] will get better. If I was expecting to remain in hotel I would try and have Ethen come out here & see if it could not help him but now I think I shall sell out in spring & possibly go to “Black Hills”.

D.C. C.

Tell Luke first class board at Crawford House would cost or does cost $3 per day by the week $17.50 single double 25 to $30 _____ rooms & that he must bring his wife & come out to fashionable Waterbury Place & put on style get your ______________ water every morning.

D.C.C.

No I _____ seen Miss Brown but heard of her ______________ should like to have met her.[9]

D.C.C.

[1] Ida Louise Crawford was born May 20, 1873

[2] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[3] Allie Crawford

[4] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford Betts

[5] Hiram Crawford Jr., D.C.’s brother

[6] Henry Clay Crawford, D.C.’s brother

[7] Charles Luke Keith Jr., Sarah’s husband

[8] Ethan Keith, Sarah’s son

[9] D.C.’s handwriting is hard enough to read, but the last several paragraphs were written crosswise across the page and partially overlapped the main body of the letter making it almost impossible to decipher

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