February 23, 1923 letter to Ethan Keith & Hannah Towne from Nancy Brown

February 23, 1923

To: Ethan Keith & Hannah Towne, Kalamazoo, MI

From: Nancy Brown, Chicago, IL

Writes how she has been muddled for over a week and at times things seem to be a blank. Reports on how the candy business is going. Claude is giving the girls money so they can fix up the basement and buy a stove and marble slab to make it easier for them.

Friday P.M.[1]
Feb 23rd 1923

Dear brother and sister

Every thing is at sixes and sevens or I am at least. Cant think how to even spell. I have been terribly muddled for over a week. Cant tell how only every thing seems to be a blank at times. Its so slippery out. I have not dared to go out to get a stamp and send the Argus[2] money. Lela[3] is going down town about three. If she has time will see to it if not I’ll get it as soon as I possibly can. I had a nice letter from Ina to day. Said she was going to write to you and Lou.[4] She had a nice long letter from Walter thanking us for the candy. He addressed it “Nancy Lee Cholate Co.”[5]

I wrote Aunt Jennie[6] a long letter to day it got return was returned. I took the address from the Argus.  Hedwig has been home sick all the week. Guess its the flue all right. Aunt Kate[7] only sits up about half the time. Has bronchial phenomonia asthma. Water[8] writes the medicine his father[9] is taking is helping him they think. I wrote Jim the first of week to see if he got the coat. Have not heard a word. None of them have written one word about the candy from Jims. I wish they would let me know about the coat. I think it ought to be worth a post card. Its a good warm coat. Claude[10] paid one hundred and ten dollars. Of course its worn some but not ragged. I sent it had it insured so it dont cost them one cent. When I sent it I wrote a letter and asked some of them to let me know if they got it. I wont bother Lou to let me know. It dont make any one feel like spending much time or money. Bess[11] has been home three days this week coming again ____ afternoon. To day is Carrie Svensens birthday 42 same age as Bess. Bess has fixed her up a nice box of candy. Claude is going to let the girls have money to fix up about half the basement get them a large stove and marble slab. Then they can make in one batch as much fondant as they have to now in in one batch as it takes them to make five now and much easier for them. They will make fondant in basement, mould and dip and pack in attic. Claude has been awful good to the girls and Lou.[12] The girls appreciate it too.

I could talk if I could see you. I told Lela this morning if the children[13] had two weeks vacation this spring and you were both well enough I take them and go home for the two weeks then make my visit later but she says  they only have one week. She has gone and forgot my letter but I’ll certainly send Argus money next week. How much did Will charge you.

With love

Nan

[1] Written upside down in front of the word “Friday” was the word “Quarantine”

[2] Believe she is referring to a newspaper

[3] Nancy’s daughter, Lela (Brown) Mueller

[4] Nancy’s sister, Louese (Keith) Harris

[5] See the following page for information on the candy business

[6] Virginia (Worley) Crawford, her Uncle Henry Crawford’s wife

[7] Katherine (Atchinson) Crawford, her Uncle Hiram Crawford’s wife

[8] Believe she is referring to her nephew, Walter Keith

[9] Nancy’s brother, Jim Keith, who had asthma

[10] Nancy’s son, Claude Brown

[11] Nancy’s daughter, Bess (Brown) Recoschewitz

[12] Lela’s husband, Louis Mueller. Lou had previously been hit by a streetcar and sustained a brain injury. As a result he would have seizures. Lela was able to care for him at home in the beginning but later had to admit him to Elgin State Hospital where he remained until his death in 1942

[13] Lela’s daughter, Helen and Eda “Jean” Mueller

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August 29, 1921 letter to Nancy Brown from Lela Mueller

August 29, 1921                               

To: Nancy Brown, Kalamazoo, MI

From: Lela Mueller, Chicago, IL

Mr. Dee is getting married and has packed his trunks, given the kids lost of stuff and gave her and Lou a photo of himself in uniform. Aunt Kate had a hard substance removed from her face. Harry didn’t call her while she was at Lela’s and Lela doesn’t know where Kate and Jessie will go when they return from Lake Mills. Lou had another spell and had to come home. Mr. Bonnet told Claude that Lou couldn’t even talk when he left the office. Lou has slept all day and Lela doesn’t know what to do for him.

Monday 6 P.M.

Dear Ones All:[1]

Will start a letter now and finish it to-morrow. Dinner is all ready but “getting” done – have a baked chicken, fresh corn, cut off the cobs, cucumber. Next week we wont have to eat at all if we dont want to. It will seem good in one way and in another way I’m awfully sorry. We never can get another Mr Dee,[2] and I’m not going to give meals to any one even if I rent the room, at least I dont intend to.

Mr Dee packed his trunks yesterday, gave the kids[3] lots of stuff and gave us an elegant photo of himself, head and shoulders, in uniform. They are coming over to dinner soon after they are married. We are anxious to see the bride. The kids dont seem to care much about his going, but Martha[4] is some blue.

Received your card this A.M. thanks for the napkins, Edie[5] sent me 3 and is going to do my table cloth after decoration Day.

Aunt Kate[6] and Jessie[7] got here about 3 oclock Friday. Aunt Kate came from Oak Park that morning to Rose Hill, watered the grave,[8] then went down town and did several things, then to the Dr. (alone) and had her face taken care of. He took out a hard substance like stone, very small. Harry[9] didn’t call her up while she was here, and when they come back I dont know what they are going to do. They cant go there and Aunt Kate won’t go to Marions,[10] says she will never eat at Jacks table, and I cant have them here. I think they ought to have some one looking for them, but I suppose they’ll trust to luck. Jessie told me 2 or 3 times how much she thot of me. Aunt Kate said I ought to feel honored as there were very few people she cared for. I think they would have staid here till the first if I had asked them, as they cant have the cottage.

Tues. Eve.

We received your letter and the napkins to-day much obliged. I was washing so put them in – they look so nice.

Lou[11] came home about 10 oclock this morning, another spell.[12] Mr Bonnet[13] told Claude[14] he couldn’t talk when he left the office. We fixed a bed on the porch and another in the dining room, as I was washing and it would make so much running for me. He has slept all day and is still sleeping only when I rouse him. I dont think he suffers as much as before – but seems dazed. I wish I knew what to do. Claude was just here says he’s got to let go somewhere.

I wont attempt to answer your letter to-night or write much more. Dont think I’ll let Jean go to Davenport[15] even if Lou goes. I dont know as he would be able to take care of her. I know he wouldnt if he should have a spell. I hate to disappoint mother[16] but may have to. Claude said he thought he shouldn’t go.

Want Martha to mail this so will say good-night.

Lots of love to all

Lela

[1] Lela was writing to her mother who was apparently visiting her brother and sister

[2] Mr. Dee was one of Lela and Lou’s boarders

[3] Lela’s daughters, Helen and Jean Mueller

[4] Martha Lueder, another boarder

[5] Lela’s sister-in-law, Edith (Neumaier) Brown

[6] Katherine (Atchinson) Crawford. Kate was the widow of Hiram Crawford Jr., who was the brother of Lela’s grandmother, Sarah (Comfort) Crawford

[7] Kate’s daughter, Jessie (Crawford) Eck

[8] Kate’s husband, Hiram, was buried at Rosehill Cemetery in Chicago

[9] Kate’s son, Harry Crawford

[10] Jessie’s daughter, Marian (Eck) Meiss

[11] Lela’s husband, Louis Mueller

[12] Lou had previously been hit by a streetcar and sustained a brain injury. As a result he would have seizures. Lela was able to care for him at home in the beginning but later had to admit him to Elgin State Hospital where he remained until his death in 1942

[13] Lou worked as an accountant at Bonnet-Brown; Arthur Bonnet and Claude Brown were partners

[14] Claude Brown was Lela’s brother

[15] Davenport, Iowa, where Lou’s mother lived

[16] Lou’s mother, Augusta (Ficke) Mueller