February 16, 1902 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

February 16, 1902

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Ida and Harold are both well. She has not been very well this winter. Had to work so much harder than ever before and misses her darling husband so much. Ida is engaged to a young student attending the university there and works in her office of County Superintendent of Schools. Everybody says she makes a good officer.

Scan of 1902-02-16 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden, Feb 16th 1902[1]

My dear Sister Sarah,

I recieved your dear letter and was very glad to hear from you. Ida and Harold[2] are both well. I have not been very well this winter, have been miserable nearly all the time. I have had to work so much harder than I ever did before and at my age,[3] it comes rather hard on me. I miss my darling husband[4] so much. Yes, I can sympathize with poor Nancy[5] and know how she suffers. Isent is strange that her husband and mine died so near and in appearently the same manner. I have thought of it so many times and they were such dear good husbands.

Our children of course are dear to us, but they soon have lives of their own and then if Father is gone, Mother is alone.

Harold is a nice good boy and loves his mother dearly. He is such a comfort to me. Ida is engaged to a young student[6] attending the university here and of course her attention is taken up with him. She is in her office of County Superintendent[7] and she makes a good officer so every body says. Sarah, I recieved a letter from brother Robert,[8] but I could not make out the address. Will you please send it to me so that I may write him. I am sorry that I have not done so before this. I want to answer all the good letters that I have recieved. Am slow but try to be sure about that anyway.

Give my love to all of your family. You know I may not remember all their names and tell Nancy that her Aunt knows more than any one else how lonely her life is. Am glad to hear from you at anytime you can write me. With love to yourself.

I am your sister Amanda[9]

——-

[1] The stationery and envelope had a black border, which was used when there had been a death in the family

[2] Amanda’s children

[3] Amanda was 50 at the writing of this letter

[4] Amanda’s husband and Sarah’s brother, David Caleb “D.C.” Crawford, died May 1, 1901 at the age of 65

[5] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown, whose husband, Henry Brown, died May 22, 1901 at the age of 50

[6] This may be referring to Jack Kelly, whom Ida married May 14, 1904

[7] Ida was the County Superintendent of Schools for Jefferson County, Colorado

[8] Robert Crawford, Amanda’s brother-in-law and Sarah’s brother

[9] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford

(This post was updated on 05-15-2021)

May 19, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Robert Crawford

May 19, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Robert Crawford, Neenah, WI

Robert is writing Sarah in response to the news of D.C.’s death. Robert went to visit his daughter Lulu who is to be married in July. He is helping his son-in-law on the farm.

1901-05-19 Robert Crawford to Sarah Keith

Neenah, May 19″, 1901

Dear Sister Sarah,

I read you letter hastily & Papers[1] announcing the Death of our dear Brother DC Crawford.[2] It was quite unexpected to me and very sad news. I deeply sympathize with his wife,[3] her son[4] & daughters[5] in this great affliction but it is my dear sister that comes to us all. I can hardly realize Sarah that DC is dead. I have not met him in 25 years and he has not written to me in 3 or 4 years but that is his way business of course. I dont have any unpleasant feelings that way. I read Amanda letter by the way of Henry.[6] It is very sad. Poor woman. I have written to her a letter of condolence & sympathy. I will return to you Sister the Paper & Statement and letter of DC death.

We are all usually well. My work on the River will not commence till in July some time owing to the drought. It keeps the Logs back. I shall not get till in Oct next perhaps. We have not had any frost yet to hurt fruit but it is quite cool this morning. I was down to see Lulu[7] last Sunday. Her School will close in 3 weeks. She expects to be married in July[8] if she dont change her mind in regard to it. I am helping my son in law[9] on the farm some. He is going to put in 2 acres of tomatoes for a canning factory. Good bye for this time Sister dear. Regards & love to you all.

Brother Robert

Robt Crawford

—–

[1] Unfortunately the whereabouts of the “Papers” is unknown and an online search has not yet come up with D.C.’s obituary

[2] David Caleb Crawford

[3] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford

[4] Harold Valentine Crawford

[5] D.C. only had one living daughter, Ida (Crawford) Kelley; two daughters died in infancy/childhood

[6] Henry Clay Crawford, Robert’s brother

[7] His daughter, Lulu Crawford

[8] Lulu married Edward Witte on July 18, 1901

[9] Jackson Tullar, the second husband of Robert’s daughter, Edna (Crawford) Henry Tullar

(This post was updated on 2-18-2021)

May 5, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

May 5, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Amanda is writing to Sarah to inform her of D.C.’s death and the circumstances leading up to it.

Scan of 1901-05-05 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden, May 5th

My dear Sister and Brothers,

My heart is to heavy to say much but I am in duty bound to tell you of my loss. My husband is dead.[1] He has been sick with bad cold for some six weeks, was home most of the time for last three weeks but would not give up and was in Denver all of the last week attending to his business affairs. I tried to have him come home but he said he was not sick enough. I was with him evry other day and heard from him evry day. He would not go to bed and I did not realize how bad he was. I was with him all day on Monday and Tuesday he expected to return to Cripple Creak, but did not and on Tuesday evening sent for me and I went down on early train expecting him to meet me, but as he did not I went to his room and found my darling unconscious. He revived and knew me once or twice but did not know Ida.[2] We were both with him all day until the end. I had left Harold[3] at home and he did not know of his father’s death until next day. Oh, how can I ever stand it. My poor darling. We loved each other so and he always lived for and loved his little family. As I do not know the address of either of the boys[4] so please forward this letter to them or let them know of their Brother’s death. Ida has sent the papers to you also. My poor dear husband is at rest and sleeps by the side of his two little babies Allie and Mamie[5] at Riverside Denver.

In sorrow,

Your Sister

Amanda

——-

[1] David Caleb (D.C.) Crawford, was 65 years old at the time of his death on May 1, 1901

[2] Ida Louise (Crawford) Kelly, Amanda’s daughter

[3] Harold “Doc” Crawford, Amanda’s son

[4] D.C. had four brothers still living at the time of his death: Robert, Henry, Hiram and Lucius Prosper “Pros” Crawford

[5] Both daughters died in early childhood

(This post was updated on 02-13-2021)

December 7, 1899 letter to Luke & Sarah Keith from D.C. Crawford

December 7, 1899

To: Luke & Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: D.C. Crawford, Cripple Creek, CO

Speaks of their Golden Wedding Anniversary. The great Cripple Creek fire put him in a financial bind. Before the fire his income was $30 a day clear. All outstanding accounts were valueless and there was no business for over two years. His family lives in Golden. They lived in Cripple Creek for three years but the cost was too high. Ida is teaching school at Fort Collins. Amanda and his son, who he thinks will be nine on February 14, are at home. A handwritten note on the envelope reads “Uncle D. C. Crawford’s last letter to Ma.”

1899-12-07A 1899-12-07B 1899-12-07C 1899-12-07D 1899-12-07E 1899-12-07env

Cripple Creek, Dec 7, 1899

Dear Brother and Sister
Galesburg, Mich.

When I opened my Box at the P.O. and tore open the wrapper exposing a newspaper and I read the word Galesburg, I commenced to hunt for items and was pleasantly surprised when I read of your “Golden Wedding Anniversary”[1]. Surely it must have been a joyful meeting of so many of you under the old homestead roof and to one and all must brought to mind many many of the reminiscences of by gone days at the eventful time full of the joys and hopes of youth. I note all were present except H. L. Keith[2] and James[3] – that was to be regreted as on such an occasion all should have tried hard to have been present. I would liked to have been present myself. Well, My Dear relatives we are getting along in years and these reunions should be encouraged as it brings us together, renews our friendships so to speak as we are apt to become unmindful of each other when long separated as in my own persenal experence. I do not know just when but has been years since we have exchanged letters. Why simply because we just neglected it. Other cares and duties have daily taken up all of our time (and absent friends and relatives have been to a certain extent almost forgotten.) This should not be, yet I am “guilty”. My time for past ten years has been almost incessently taken up. The great Cripple Creek Fire put me in such a financial shape that my whole time was taken up to exist for along time after the fire. At the time of the fire my income was about $30.00 per day clear and all outstanding accounts were valuless and there was no business for over 2 years. We are experencing better times but nothing to compare (at that time). While this is a great mining camp there are a great many poor people here. We have to put forth the same effort to make a dollar here as elsewhere. My family do not live here. They live at Golden, Colo. They lived here for three years but little to high here and having a home there, and Ida[4] is teaching school at Fort Collins 75-miles beyond Golden. (Amanda[5] and the Boy[6], who is coming 9-years of age, I believe February 14th are at home and Ida and myself are out restling for bread and butter. Of course, I would be very glad to see you all. Yet, I cannot promise that I can. “Darne fortune” has all to say about it. I find the battle of live much harder task in last twenty years then previous to that. Many a lucky fellow has made fortunes here but think of the thousands that expended their little all and went hungry and walked out of camp while his more fortunate Brother rides in and out in Palace cars. Now that I have commenced, I must write to Brother Robert[7] and Brother Hiram[8]. Both have written me and I do not quite remember if I have answered either of them. As stated, I am getting quite advanced in years and cannot move around as in former years. Yet I do get around all right and have the name of being the leivliest man of my age on the street. I will enclose one of my pictures as I look now. Well in conclusion will say that please remember me kindly to all the children and their parents, both present and absent. I had forgotten Louis[9] husbands Name. I note now Mrs Skinner[10] and her son C I Clark, wife[11] & 3 children[12]. He has done well, very nice man. He was with us awhile. Well dear Luke and Sarah, may God continue to bless you and yours and if it is our destiny never to meet on the shores of time may we hope to meet in the great hereafter if it be the will of him who doeth all things well.[13]

Your loving Brother

D.C. Crawford[14]

Box 34

——-

[1] Sarah Crawford & Charles Luke Keith Jr. were married November 14, 1849 in Comstock Township, Michigan

[2] Henry Keith, Luke’s son by his first wife, Minerva Payson

[3] James Keith, Sarah and Luke’s son

[4] Ida (Crawford) Kelley, D.C.’s eldest daughter

[5] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[6] Harold Valentine Crawford, D.C.’s son

[7] Robert Crawford

[8] Hiram Crawford

[9] Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner, Luke’s daughter by his first wife, Minerva Payson

[10] Lois’ second husband was Adelbert Skinner

[11] Charles Ira and Clara (Youngs) Clark. Charles was Lois’ son by her first husband, Byron Clark

[12] Edna, Ethan & Charles Clark

[13] There is a note on the envelope that this was Uncle D.C. Crawford’s last letter to Ma

[14] David Caleb Crawford