March 10, 1924 letter to Nancy Brown from Edna Tullar

March 10, 1924

To: Nancy Brown

From: Edna Tullar

Edna Tullar is making arrangements to purchase a box of candy from her cousins. She is certain that her nephew, Robert Carlson, will love the candies more than anything else. She is also updating her cousin on the activities of her family, including the desire to visit California to see her nephew, Donald Carlson, who is begging for Edna and her husband, Jack, to visit. She also mentions her Aunt Kate Crawford, her cousin, Jessie Crawford Eck, and wonders when Jessie’s daughter will marry. Edna is concerned about a growth on her son, Ted’s, neck. It had been growing for six months and seemed to be affecting his hearing. After a thorough examination and x-ray, it was determined to be a stone in the gland and needed to be operated on immediately. Although it is not a serious operation, it is a tedious one that will take about two hours with nothing but local anesthesia. Poor Ted is worried sick over it. Her other son, Frank, is traveling for the week and will be missed. The company is doing very well and Frank brings in most of the business. Edna is bringing Nancy up to date on her sisters, Kit, Lizzie, Lulu and Bird. Lulu and her husband, Ed Witte, have had a struggle this winter. His insurance business has not been doing well and it has created financial problems for them. In the midst of all this trouble, Aunt Kate wrote and wanted to visit Lulu. Lulu never answered the letter; however, Edna filled Aunt Kate in on Lulu’s situation. Aunt Kate could appreciate the position Lulu was in for she had been there herself. Bird & family well.

Monday Morn March 10-1924

Dear Nancy

Your good long letter came this A.M. and I am ans. right back for I am going to city and I will enclose money order for $3.00 and tell you the card box, will be all right. I am sure now if this amount isnt enough, you be sure & tell me, for if I can afford to do this, I can pay the price. I know Rob.[1] will like the candy more than anything else I can afford to send him & he can share it with Melisse.[2] Mrs. Fraser called me up Friday, said they had just gotten a letter from you, said she had called me before, but could not get me. Well I will admit that I am some what of a gadder[3] & possibly I might have been away from home. She will have news to tell you when they ans. He is to be retired this yr. & their Calif. _____ theirs. So you can see how nice it will be when we all get there. Sure you can go with Jack[4] & I and we will all find something to do when we get there, keep house for Don,[5] he is begging us to come in every letter he writes. I tell him to get married & have a home of his own. He say “no wedding bells for him.” Now Nancy you will just have to plan on coming to us this summer for you must visit the Frasers once more. We expect to go to Wis in June & on our way back we will stop over a day & you come on home with us. Now if the girls have Dorothy[6] this summer they can spare you for a while. Isnt it just fine Dorothy is to be so near you and I am so pleased for her. I guess she is as old as you & I were when we were married[7] – & age don’t mean anything. It’s just how sensible they are, and I am sure she has is that all right. That is a mighty fine start. We didnt have that either did we? I cant tell, Nancy, how Uncle Harry worked father[?] for. I was going to say $50.00 when I first thought, but I am not sure. $50.00 was a lot of money in those days. Is he up to something more now? When will Jessies[8] daughter[9] get married. Aunt Kate[10] wrote me about her engagement. Also I hope she will do differently than the other one,[11] get a better man I mean. We are a little worried and worked up at our house. Ted[12] has had a buncle[13] on his neck for over 6 months. Pearle[14] and all of us have tried to have him attend to it. Well he asked his doctor at factory about it & he could not tell him much, but advised Ford Hospital for thorough examination. It has kept growing & seemed to affect his hearing so last wk. he went – had Xrays & all. They tell him it is what is called a stone in his gland. Said from neck down he was perfect – physically – but this must come out immediately or would cause cancer. So next Sat. he is to be operated on & while it is not a serious operation it is a tedious one about two hours & nothing but local anesthesia done from inside & can work much better when one is concious. Poor Ted, never a thing before this matter with him. He is about sick over it & I do feel sorry for him. When we think of all the operations you have had for your self & family this seems silly but just the same I cant help but wish it were over. Ted will be 39 next Monday. He said he would clebrate in Hospital. I am so thankful they are fixed so it wont mean much to him in a financial way or if Ted has to stop work for a while. Pearle is spendid about it & wants everything done right, no money spared. Frank[15] has gone to Lansing & those[?] town for a part of the wk. We are lonely with out him. Factory doing spendidly – biggest months income in Feb. they have ever had & Frank brings in most of it but Chester[16] is doing well by him & Frank seems quite contented and happy he is getting to be such a big fellow. Dear Hannah & Ethan.[17] How I wish I could go to them when they have such a long lonely winter or they could come to me. I am going to write Hannah & very soon. Did you ever hear how Madge[18] came out with her suit? It would be so much easier if Bessie[19] could live near Lela[20] and it is fine they mean so much to each other. Oh I know how it is. Kit[21] and I were just that way & it was so hard when Kit was married & went away. She never was Kit again to me and then after Louise came she was so near and dear & we used to visit and talk like sisters and now I am so far from them all. Poor Lizzie[22] has a nice new house, new furniture, new Buick car and was sick in bed with no one to do a thing for her. They have done splendidly in a financial way but Lizzie says she can not make C.S. make him well any more & is so tired trying. Lulu[23] & Ed[24] have had a hard struggle this winter. Ed in insurance business for him self & not doing much. Lu wrote me at Xmas time said they were in debt. She had no shoes, hat or gloves not much else. Could I send $50.00. Well I had a Xmas fund of $50.00 so I sent her $35.00 then wrote to Lizzie & Bird.[25] Lizzie sent her $25.00, Bird $10.00 & a hat & I sent gloves & stockings. Well after that they got $1,000 from Ed’s mothers estate so they will fly high for a little while but Lu has gone to taking borders. Just in the midst of all this trouble Aunt Kate wrote & wanted to visit Lu. Well Lu never ans. the letter, said she was to near crazy but I told Aunt Kate some thing of situation & told her Lu would write someday. I guess Aunt Kate can realize the position Lu was in for she has been there herself. Bird & family well. Donald, her second son, has been in Seattle but comes home this mo. Carol[26] in Normal school, now home. Nancy, send some more of your cards.[27] Bird wants one & some more I know I want to send to. Well I must ring off. Do hope Lou[28] get so he can come home. Poor fellow, such a home & he has to be away.

Lovingly

Edna

Nancy you might send this to Hannah & Ethan it will tell them about Ted & girls. I’ll write you a card as soon as Ted is opered on.

[1] Believe this is her nephew, Robert Carlson, whose birthday was March 17. He had lived with the Tullars at the time of the 1920 Census

[2] Melissa P Keiser, who married Robert on August 4, 1920

[3] To move about restlessly or with little purpose

[4] Edna’s husband, Jackson Tullar

[5] Believe this is her nephew, Donald Carlson

[6] Nancy’s granddaughter, Dorothy Recoschewitz

[7] Dorothy was engaged to Joseph Langmayer; she was 20 years old. Nancy was 20 and Edna was 22 when they were married

[8] Jessie (Crawford) Eck, Edna’s cousin

[9] Believe this is Katherine Eck, although Katherine did not actually marry until 1944

[10] Katherine (Atchinson) Crawford, widow of Hiram Crawford Jr. who was Edna’s and Nancy’s uncle

[11] Edna is referring to Jessie Marian Eck, who was married to Charles Meiss

[12] Edwin Dale Henry, Edna’s son by her first husband

[13] Edna appears to be referring to a carbuncle

[14] Ted’s wife, Pearl (Shelly) Henry

[15] Franklin Tullar, Edna’s son by her second husband

[16] Chester Wagner Tullar, Edna’s brother-in-law and President of the Tullar Envelope Company

[17] Nancy’s sister and brother, Hannah (Keith) Towne and Ethan Keith

[18] Madge Allen, granddaughter of Edna’s & Nancy’s Uncle Edwin Crawford

[19] Nancy’s daughter, Bess (Brown) Recoschewitz

[20] Nancy’s daughter, Lela (Brown) Mueller

[21] Edna’s sister, Katherine (Crawford) Birkland

[22] Edna’s sister, Melissa (Crawford) Smith

[23] Edna’s sister, Lulu (Crawford) Witte

[24] Lulu’s husband, Edward Witte

[25] Edna’s sister, Cynthia (Crawford) Carlson

[26] Carol Carlson, Bird’s daughter

[27] Presume she is referring to business cards for Nancy Keith Candies

[28] Lela’s husband, Louis Mueller. Lou had previously been hit by a streetcar and sustained a brain injury. As a result he would have seizures. Lela was able to care for him at home in the beginning but had been admitted to St. Mary of the Hills in Milwaukee, Wisconsin


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August 24, 1921 letter to Nancy Brown from Lela Mueller

August 24, 1921

To: Nancy Brown

From: Lela Mueller

Has been so busy she didn’t have time to write, but will lay low until school starts so she can get her sewing done. Went to Deer Grove with Claude & Edie on Saturday and then again on Tuesday to help pick vegetables. Aunt Kate and Jessie came on Monday and wanted to know if they could come back on Tuesday and stay till they left for Lake Mills. When they got back from the farm on Tuesday they found Aunt Kate on the porch crying. Harry hadn’t offered to help her to the car or even show any concern about her going or coming back.

Wednesday eve.

Dear Ones All:[1]

I have been on the go so much for the last week havent had time to write or hardly breathe but I’m going to lay low now till school starts or I wont get any sewing done.

I’ll go back to last Thursday. I took the 3 children[2] down to Wiebolds for a hair cut, then went to Bessies[3] for dinner. Martha[4] staid at Aunt Helen’s all night (they didnt go on the boat) then Friday Helen and Jean were invited to Katherines for the day, so I had to leave here before eleven, then went down town from there, got home at 5:30. When I got home found my electric flat-iron still connected and a hole in my ironing sheet, but iron is all right it was lucky.

Saturday morning I go

Lou[5] called for the children Friday but they didnt want to come home so they staid all night. We had a terrible rain and some tornado wind that night – water about 2 inches deep in the basement. Mrs Cady told the children it was fireworks from Heaven she had asked for especially for their entertainment that eve. so they were happy.

Sat. I had a big washing and had just gotten every thing going when Lou phoned we were to go to Deer Grove (Palatine) with Claude and Edie[6] so I had some hustling to get my wash done and dry and get ready. Claude stopped on the way over and got the children. We changed their clothes and started – had a lovely time only slept cold. Sunday was a beautiful day and we enjoyed it. Monday Jean was sick all day, vomited. When we got home Sunday eve. found a note from Aunt Kate.[7] She and Jessie[8] had been here, said she would come again Mon. A.M. Got here about ten and staid till one – wanted to know if she could come here Tues. and stay till they went to Lake Mills Sat. Said she wanted to get every thing away from Harrys[9] Tues. and so came here. I gave her the key as we were going to the Farm Tues. She has gone to Oak Park will be back to morrow and asked if Jessie could come too so they could go to the train to-gether. Its too bad they ever gave up their flat. Katherine[10] moved from Harrys about 2 weeks ago. They were with her just as they were with Jessie. Katherine went to Omaha to visit Aunt Pet Atkinson I guess.

When we got home from the farm Aunt Kate was on the front porch – had been crying. When she came away Harry didn’t offer to even help her to the car – nor show any concern about her going or coming back.

We went to the farm Tues. to get the rest of the beans and corn. Martha, the kids and I went on the train. Left here at 1200 and the train we expected to take only runs Sat – so we had to wait over 3 hours. Got out there about 4:30 – tired, hungry and provoked. So much to do there and here and just sat there waiting. I tried to get paper so I could write to you – but no chance.

Lou came out on the 6 oclock train and Claude and Edie about seven in the machine. We couldnt pick all there was it got dark so early.

Hillmans had a sale of Wilson’s dried beef last week 5 pounds for 1.55 – 35¢ a pound – we pay 80¢. Lou got a box and it was fine. Another sale to-day so he is going to try and get over and get a box for you folks. If he does I’ll send it in the morning.

I had a crate partly filled with beans and a little corn so it wouldn’t shuck. Martha took it over here and they wouldnt accept it. Said the paper was torn. She was on her way to Bessies so took it there. Dont know whether you’ll get it or not.

This is a terrible jumble but I’ve gotten so behind with every thing I cant think till I get cleared out a little. Have cleaned up stairs good to-day and now I’m going to iron. Mrs Leuders is having her vacation, Martha has gone to Lincoln Park but will be home tomorrow Sat & Sunday.

Helen had the same trouble yesterday that Jean had Monday, only was sicker and it lasted longer – is all right to-day.

Lou feels better, is taking a tonic, goes over again to-night. Mr Dee[11] about the same.

Love to All

Lela

[1] Lela was writing to her mother who was apparently visiting her brother and sister

[2] Presume she means her two daughters, Helen and Jean, and Martha Lueder

[3] Lela’s sister, Bess (Brown) Recoschewitz

[4] Believe that this was Martha Lueder, who boarded at Lela’s house

[5] Lela’s husband, Louis Mueller

[6] Lela’s brother, Claude Brown, and his wife, Edith (Neumaier) Brown

[7] Katherine (Atchinson) Crawford. Kate was the widow of Hiram Crawford Jr., who was the brother of Lela’s grandmother, Sarah (Comfort) Crawford

[8] Kate’s daughter, Jessie (Crawford) Eck

[9] Kate’s son, Harry Crawford

[10] Jessie’s daughter, Katherine Eck

[11] Mr. Dee was one of Lela and Lou’s boarders

June 17, 1920 letter to Nancy Brown from Kate Crawford

June 17, 1920

To: Nancy Brown, Kalamazoo, MI

From: Kate Crawford, Chicago, IL

Kate writes that they are a good ways off from being settled. The bottom fell out of the money bag, so she and Hiram must wait. Tomorrow is Taylor’s & Helen’s 15th birthday and next Thursday night they graduate. She expects to witness the ceremony and then the aunts and uncles and cousins will repair to the house and all talk at once and eat ice cream and cake. They are going to give Taylor a watch and Nell had given Harry a diamond stick pin before they were married and they have had it set in a ring for Helen. Hiram bought Taylor a real leather belt with monogramed sterling buckle. All these various things coming along is the reason they cannot get settled.

5412 Underwood Ave

6-17-20

Dear Nan

I am sitting in the gloaming and thought I would draft you a line or two to let you know we were here as yet. I hardly need tell you about the weather. I fancy there is not much difference between this place & yours. It was so in L.M.[1] What ever we were there, I knew it was about the same here. There was a radical change last night and today it has been uncomfortably cold. Papa[2] started for down town & he was so cold he came back and changed his underwear. Jessie[3] went to work yesterday and that leaves Papa and I alone and I find the work exceeds the cottage. I am so glad I had three quiet years. I wish I had enjoyed them even more. Jessie has to leave at half past six & I get up and help her and about the time she is gone, K[4] comes on the scene so I am up about an hour. Then I lie down but seldom sleep. I am almost as much of a stranger as if I had never lived here. I do not go out much. I have been down town twice, to a funeral in Rogers Park, a lady 70 years old I knew when she was a girl, and out to Mr Dewey’s in R.P. one evening. We are a good ways off from being settled. The bottom kind of fell out of the money bag, so we must wait. Tomorrow is Taylor & Helen’s 15th birthday[5] and next Thursday night they graduate. We are expected to witness the ceremony and then the Aunts & Uncles & cousins will repair to the house and all talk at once and eat ice cream and cake. They are going to give Taylor a watch & Nell[6] had given Harry[7] a diamond stick pin before they were married and they have had it set in a ring for Helen. Papa bought Taylor a real leather belt with monogram sterling buckle. All these various things coming along is the reason we cannot get settled. We thought we would get H[elen] a camasole, so Papa said. Now Jessie Saturday aft– you go and get the carousal for Helen. We had quite a laugh over it. We have not seen or heard from Lela.[8] We have no phone service as yet. The landlady is real good. Anyone who has her number calls there for us. She touches our bell and then they can use this phone, but no one can call us here. The man emptied the box this morning of the last tenant’s nickles and he said they were up against it every where.

The prospect for canning is very poor. We had to stop buying berries they were so poor & so high. Potatoes way out of sight. We used to say to people we invited to dine with us (they would say don’t do a lot of work for us) & we would reply – oh we will just drop two or three extra potatoes in the pot. But now, nothing doing. I hope Hannah[9] is feeling better now you are there. I tell you it is lovely for anyone who has a garden. Oh how I miss L.M. Plenty of everything. Milk & cream 12 cts instead of 15 & 16, ice box filled to overflowing, plenty of eggs. We got 12 doz four weeks ago from Leroy’s. Almost gone now. We could get lots of fruit & fresh vegetables. When you are enjoying all these luxuries, just think of us.

I had a nice letter from Laura[10] a few days ago. She is very lonely. Mays husband[11] sprained his ankle just after L.P.[12] passed away and was confined to the house about three weeks. Did you know Leo & his wife[13] were separated?

You can hardly imagine how different it is here from L.M. Last Saturday I listened to pianos of all grades, victrolas, Auto horns, babies crying and sundry other sounds. Not agreable to any ears, but who am I in this motley crowd. If you get the Chicago news, you must be startled with the killings going on and 9 out of 10, a woman at the bottom of it. The last time I heard from M[14] she was getting along. She had to have two or three stitches. Baby was a fine healthy fellow.[15] She had plenty of milk, which is a great blessing. When she was in the hospital, she wrote to her mother[16] & it did not reach her, but was returned. She wrote on the envelope, see what Jack[17] did, directed it wrong. He wrote under it, could not help it, so excited at being a father, Jack.

I am sorry you are going to be gone all summer. I am very lame at times. It is with difficulty I can get around and to add to my joy, the middle finger of my right hand has been crippled with rheumatism, but is so now I can use my hand. Now I have told you all my ills. And it seems by the way my eyes feel it is bed time so I will close by sending love to all from all and hoping to hear from you soon.

Aunt Kate

Got muddled with the paper

[1] Lake Mills, WI where Kate and Hiram had had a summer cottage

[2] Hiram Crawford Jr.

[3] Jessie (Crawford) Eck, Kate’s daughter

[4] Katherine Louesa Eck, Kate’s granddaughter

[5] The twin children of Harry and Nellie (Sullivan) Crawford and Kate’s grandchildren

[6] Kate’s daughter–in-law

[7] Harry Crawford, Kate’s son

[8] Lela (Brown) Mueller, Nancy’s daughter

[9] Hannah (Keith) Towne, Nancy’s sister

[10] Laura (Hands) Blake Crawford, the second wife of Lucius Prosper Crawford, Hiram’s brother

[11] Believe she is referring to James MacDermott, the husband of her daughter, Laura May (Blake) MacDermott

[12] Lucius Prosper “Pros” Crawford, who died in Berkeley, California on March 4, 1920

[13] Pros’ son, Leo Crawford, and Ella (Drew) Crawford

[14] Kate’s granddaughter, Marian (Eck) Meiss

[15] Jack Meiss Jr., Marian’s son

[16] Jessie (Crawford) Eck

[17] Jack Meiss, Marian’s husband

June 6, 1902 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Jr.

June 6, 1902

To: Sarah Keith

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Chicago, IL

Hiram is writing Sarah to tell her that the letter sent mistakenly to Colorado had been forwarded to him by Amanda. Hiram has just moved to a new home at 1521 West Adams Street, which has a large back porch and good-sized yard. He has heard nothing from Prosper, but Robert expects to visit next month.

Anthracite=Bituminous Coal Co.
Miners and Dealers in Coal.
Office and Yard, 1619 1634 North Washtenaw California Avenue,
On C. & N.-W. RY.

Telephone … West 575.                                                    Chicago, June 6th, 1902

My Dear Sister

Your letter which went to Golden reached me all right. When I opened the envelope and found Amanda’s[1] letter in it, I knew what had happened. And immediately forwarded her letter and requested her to mail mine to me, but she returned it to you. Which is the woman of it.

I am glad to know that at least things are not any worse with you than usual. And would be much more so if I could know that they were better. We sent a box of chop to you this week. Dont send any money for it. We can furnish you all the chop you need without any trouble.

Charley[2] has given up the Docters and is couping(?) himself to taking “Germcide” and is gradually growing better. The maker of it says that he is perfectly confident that if he sticks to it, that it will cure him. It is the only medicine that he has ever taken that would agree with his stomach over ten days, which certainly is a good sign. He is commencing to do a little work, but not much. Has to go very slow.

We have got settled in our new abode, 1521 W. Adams Street. It is a two story flat. 1st floor, large back porch and good sized yard. We all enjoy it, particularly Marion[3], who is out much of the time. It is the first time the poor child has had a chance to be out of the house, except in the streets and she enjoys it very much. The Baby[4] is thriving and is getting to be quite interesting, although Miss Marion dont allow me to have much to do with her. I had a nice visit with Nancy[5] and Lelia[6] a couple of Sundays ago. Bess[7]and her German friend[8] was out. I think that if it wasnt for that man, Nancy would feel quite contented, but he makes life miserable for her.

Blanche[9] and family are well and happy. We dont hear anything from L.P.[10] Robert[11] writes me that he is coming to Milwaukee next month and will probaby see us a visit. Love to all.

Affectionately Your Brother

H Crawford

 

[1] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C. Crawford’s widow and Hiram’s sister-in-law

[2] Both of Hiram’s daughters were married to men with Charles as the first name. Jessie was married to Charles Eck who is mentioned in previous letters as being in ill health

[3] Marian Eck, the oldest daughter of Charley and Jessie (Crawford) Eck and Hiram’s granddaughter

[4] Katherine Louise Eck

[5] Nancy (Keith) Brown, Sarah’s daughter and Hiram’s niece

[6] Nancy’s daughter, Lela Brown

[7] Bess Rae Brown, Nancy’s daughter

[8] Julius Recoschewitz, Bess’s future husband

[9] Blanche (Crawford) Hessey, Hiram’s daughter

[10] Lucius Prosper Crawford, Hiram’s younger brother

[11] Robert Crawford, Hiram’s older brother