November 22, 1901 letter to James Keith from Ethan Keith

November 22, 1901

To: James Keith, Chicago, IL

From: Ethan Keith, Galesburg, MI

Hannah does her sewing work from 7:00 in the morning until 9:00 or later at night. Ethan thinks it is too much for her and worries that she just can’t keep at that pace. She only earns $1.00 per day. Their father sings most of the time and as he is in the same room where Hannah does her sewing, it annoys her. Ethan wishes Nancy and the girls could have stayed at 736 as it was home to them and close to the gallery.

Scan of 1901-11-22 Ethan Keith to James Keith

Galesburg, Mich. Nov 22, 1901

Dear Brother

Will begin a letter to you this evening but probably will not finish it as it is most time to go to bed. The alarm will call me at 4.45 Am. (fast time) and I’ll have to get right out for I am working in and around a dressmaking shop. Hannah[1] is crowded with work. She is ready to go to sewing at seven most every morning and works until nine or after in the evening. It is too much for her. She cant always hold out at such a gait. If she was reasenably paid for her work but she does’nt make a dollar a day for her time. Pa[2] and Ma[3] are usually well. Pa has a great hobby for singing. Some of the time it is a tune and then it wont be any thing but he is at it most of the time. It annoys Hannah for he is in the room where she is sewing most of the time. Will Barber and I have worked at the pump part of two days this week. It had got a hole rusted through the pipe somewhere so it pumped sand. We pulled the pipe up and found the hole down most to the point. Have got it so it works all right to night. Nancy[4] writes you are having boils and muscular rheumatism. Seems as if it is’nt one thing its another. It’s too bad and very discouraging to have to be sick so much. Mrs Streater[5] is sick had a light stroke of paralysis. Harry[6] said this morning she was better physically, but was worse mentally. Clara Clark[7] is pretty bad off. Is troubled with gall stones, suffers a great deal. Has been sick over ten weeks. Charley[8] wrote his mother[9] Wednesday that he and Edna[10] sat up with her the night before. They had to fan her a good deal of the time she was so weak. A month yesterday I came from Chicago. Seems more like three of them. I enjoyed the trip and visits if they were short. Would liked very much to have staid longer. Wish Nancy and the girls[11] could have staid at 736.[12] That had got to be like home to them, and then they were so pleasantly situated, and handy to the gallery.[13] She sent me a Heurst Chicago American[14] this week cuts, and write up of the elevated road collision. They were fortunate in not getting some of the cars off on the ground. Have not heard from Charley Eck[15] since he went from here week last Monday. We all liked him. Too bad he has such poor health.[16] The protolacea[17] Winnie[18] set in the tin can has just died. Will close for lack of news. Love to Cora,[19] children[20] and yourself.

Your brother Ethan

——-

[1] Their sister, Hannah (Keith) Towne

[2] Charles Luke Keith Jr., who was 88 years old

[3] Sarah (Crawford) Keith, who was 80 years old

[4] Their sister, Nancy (Keith) Brown

[5] Neighbor, Laura (Rawson) Streator

[6] Laura Streator’s son, Henry “Harry” Streator

[7] Clara (Youngs) Clark was the wife of Charles Clark, the son of Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner and her first husband, Byron Clark. Lois was Ethan and Jim’s half-sister, the daughter of Charles Luke Keith Jr. and his first wife, Minerva Payson

[8] Charles Clark

[9] Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner

[10] Charles and Clara Clark’s daughter

[11] Nancy’s daughters, Lela and Bess Brown

[12] Nancy’s husband, Henry Brown, died May 22, 1901 and the family moved from 736 North Hoyne Avenue in Chicago. By October of 1902 she was living at 200 Evergreen Avenue in Chicago

[13] Henry Brown was a photographer and according to the 1899-1900 Chicago City Directory had a gallery at 749 Robey Street and at 574 Lincoln Avenue. Bess continued working at the gallery for awhile, but whether it was to try to make a go of it, to take care of unfinished business, or to sell the business is unknown

[14] Hearst’s Chicago American newspaper

[15] Charles Eck was the husband of Jessie Crawford, who was Ethan and Jim’s first cousin. Jessie was the daughter of Hiram Crawford Jr., their mother’s brother

[16] Charles Eck died May 23, 1904, just shy of his and Jessie’s 6th wedding anniversary

[17] Portulacea, a succulent plant, possibly a jade plant

[18] Jim’s oldest daughter, Winifred Keith

[19] Jim’s wife, Cora (Meredith) Keith

[20] Winifred (9 years old) and Walter (almost 4 years old)

(This post was updated on 03-21-2021)

July 2, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Edna Clark

July 2, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Edna Clark, Jackson, MI

Edna is writing a thank you note to her great-grandmother.

Scan of 1901-07-02 Edna Clark to Sarah Keith

218 Grove Ave
Jackson, Mich.

July 2, 1901.

Dear Grandma and All:-

First, I want to thank Grandma for the very nice letter you wrote me and then I wish to thank you all for the present which was enclosed.

I recieved a great many and some very nice presents. I cannot write all that I got but will mention a few. There were ninteen books, right solid silver spoons, three cups and causers, five handkerchiefs, a beautiful toilet set from Grandma Skinner[1], a silver thimbal from Grandma Youngs[2] and many other things. I would like to come to Galesburg to see you all and then I can tell you more about it.

Lovingly

Edna[3]

Your Great-Grand-daughter
And Grand-neice

——-

[1] Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner, her paternal grandmother. Lois was Sarah’s step-daughter

[2] Rhoda (Wood) Youngs, her maternal grandmother

[3] Edna Clark was the daughter of Charles Clark, Lois’ son by her first husband, Byron Clark

May 17, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Nancy Brown

May 17, 1901

To: Sarah Keith

From: Nancy Brown

Nancy is concerned about her husband Hank’s health. Tuesday he had gone downtown to fix a camera shutter. He had not been home two hours before she had to send for a doctor. He has been vomiting and his stomach and bowel have been very painful and sensitive. Nancy is worried that it might be appendicitis. He has had some fever and has not been dressed since Tuesday and not been able to sit up until this morning. The doctor has been there five times in the past three days.

Scan of 1901-05-17 Nancy Brown to Keith Family

Friday 1-30-P.M.[1]

Dear ones all

Will write a little while resting my feet. Lela[2] has been working down town since Monday. Hank[3] is sick but I guess now he is going to get along all right. He is very nervous and has suffered lots. I have or at least could been a little fearful of appidencitis (I dont know as thats right). He has vomited so much & his bowels & stomach so painful & sensative and it has been impossible to get a movement of the bowels till about ten mintes ago they moved a little. So we know there is an _____________. Dr has been here five times in three days. Was here about an hour ago & is coming again to night. He says if we can get a thorough movement he will be all right and we are a going to. He has some fever. Has not been dressed since Tuesday or able to sit up any till this morning. He felt better, got up and dressed and went down town to get a shutter fixed. He was doing that when taken sick so they have been without a penny plate holder & shutter all the week over here.[4] Its his own invention and no one could fix it but him self or under his instructions. So he went to see the man & tell him. Was to have it for Sunday. He had not been home two hours before we had to send for Dr. Now I wont let him go again if we have to lock him up but he worried so over the shutter & got so nervous he could not get well any way. We have good help at both gallerys and if he dont go to work too soon it may do him a little good.

We got a letter from Dr[5] this A.M. also from Bess[6] & Mildred.[7] Dr is having so many trials cant come now but will come back with Julius[8] if he is better. Julius goes to Mich Monday. Has to be back Sat night. Was to play Sunday. We got terribly worried and excited here over Lois[9] though we thought every one at home must be very good as no one wrote. If Will Holmes[10] had went and seen Will Clark[11] and told them how it was that Ina[12] was sent for he never would have gone without looking in to it more but all he knew was what I told him and all I knew was that Lois was sick & they had sent for Ina. So when he got a message that his mother was very sick & had sent for him of course he thought it was for him. Its too bad for he has been with out work so much they did not feel able to go unless nessary. Its too bad that any one will work them selves up to such a pitch that they are _______ on any one & others have to suffer for it. Did the vegatables keep fresh enough so you could eat them? Bess writes of the dutch cheese, how good it is. If you want to send any any time we will pay charges.

Dont worry over Hank. If he dont get along all right we will let you know but he is going too. I want to tell you how cute Mother[13] is. Will[14] came down yesterday and asked her to go home with him if he would come for her to day as Hank was sick and with Lela gone it would make one less. She put on a long face & all he or I could do or say she would not go. Was not well enough so of course that ended it. In the afternoon I washed out a nyhtress & some things for Hank but as I was ready to clean thing up she wanted her dress washed. I told her I was too tired and had so much to do I could not. She said she had made up her mind to go to Wills & her dress was too dirty to wear so I said if thats it I will wash it so “het” more watter & done that. After it was done & dried and in the house she told me she did not calculate to go but wanted her dress washed. If she had been a child I guess I would “shake her boots off” but as it was I could not do a thing. I told her it could have gone to the wash and saved me that much but she said she did not care she wanted it done then. Hank is asleep and feels a good deal better than he did. Will let you know Tuesday how he is. Must write a few lines to Bess.

With love from Nan

Uncle Hi[15] and Mirian[16] came on Sunday. Brough Aunt Amandas letter,[17] also paper. Guess he feels pretty bad. It is too bad Uncle D.C.[18] had to go for he was not an old man and as Uncle Hi said guessed his family needed him. I wonder if his life was ruined. There were _____ over there to Uncle His.

Nan

7 P.M. Hank is feeling some better. Has had a good movement of the bowels. It has left him quite week but he thinks he will be all right now.

——-

[1] While no date was written, the postmark on the envelope is 5-17-1901

[2] Nancy’s daughter, Lela Brown

[3] Nancy’s husband, Henry Brown

[4] Hank was a photographer

[5] Possibly referring to Samuel “Doc” Boyer, who at the time was Lela Brown’s fiancé

[6] Nancy’s daughter, Bess Brown

[7] Nancy’s niece, Mildred Harris

[8] Julius Recoschewitz, Bess Brown’s boyfriend, was a concert violinist

[9] Nancy’s half sister, Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner

[10] Husband of Lois’ daughter, Ina

[11] Will Clark, Lois’ son from her first marriage to Byron Clark

[12] Ina (Skinner) Holmes, Lois’ daughter from her second marriage to Adelbert Skinner

[13] Hank’s mother, Matilda (Allen) Brown

[14] Hank’s brother, Willis Brown

[15] Nancy’s uncle, Hiram Crawford Jr.

[16] Marian Eck, Hiram’s granddaughter

[17] Nancy’s aunt, Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, wife of D.C. Crawford

[18] David (D.C.) Crawford, who died unexpectedly on May 1, 1901

(This post was updated on 2-18-2021)

September 21, 1873 letter to Nancy Betts from Sarah Keith

September 21, 1873

To:  Nancy Betts

From: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

Speaks of Hannah and Underwood not making up. Lucy Milham had a baby girl. Sarah thinks Lucy’s husband is a shiftless man. Thinks Lois’ husband, Del Skinner, is a good man. Eugene was there two weeks ago and he was well. She doesn’t think Mary has done the fair thing by him, but guess he will come out all right.

1873-09-21 1873-09-21B

Galesburg, Sep 21st 1873

My Dear Mother[1]

I received your very welcome letter last week, was glad to hear from you once more. I had been looking for a letter from you some time, it seemed a long while since I heard from you. I think a great many times what a privilege it is and one we ought to apreciate that we can corispond with our friends, (though separated by thousands of miles). Through the medium of the pen we can go to our friends for sympathy in our afliction and also to rejoice with us when we have cause for rejoicing. Our State Fair has been held at Grand Rappids this last week. Ethen[2] and Hannah[3] went last Tuesday. Expect them tomorrow. Mr Planks folks lives there. They wanted the children should come and stay with them during the Fair. Nancy[4] lives forty miles from them. Ethen expects to go and see her. Nancy does not write she is homesick, but I guess she would like to look in and see us all. Jane Nouge has not been expected to lieve the past three. I went and stayed all day with her last Tuesday. Deacon and Mrs Mason are quite smart. Mrs M wished to be remembered to you. Mary Lewis has got a little girl. I have got my carpet down in the front room. It looks very well. We have let a man and his wife by the name Hawley have our two south roomes. He is a going to work our place (also Aunt Pattys[5] and Aunt Katys[6]) on shares. It is a going to crunch us some for room, but I am willing to do most any way for the sake of having something done. Hannah and Underwood[7] has not made up. He has been here twice this summer. She keeps out of his way.

Lucy Milham[8] has got another baby a little girl[9]. Her health is quite good. Poor Lucy. She has lots of trouble. She has got one of the most shiftless men[10] I ever saw, a great stout healthy man as he is. Lois[11] and Dell[12] were here to day. They were quite well. I think Lois has got a good man. He seemes to think everything of her. He is a very industrious man and a good calculator, keeps his farm up in good order.

I have not felt very well the past week have had a bad cold had to work pretty hard, have been lower than usual. Eugene[13] was here two weeks ago. He was well. Think he has got a pretty chance. Dont think Mary[14] has done the fare thing by him. Guess he will come out all right. I must close and leave room for Jimmie[15]. My love to you Mother and all the rest. Please write whenever you can.

SCK

Monday morning September 22, 1873

Mrs. N. B. Betts

Dear Grandma

I thought I would write you a few lines. I am husking corn for Mr Brown[16] for 8 cents a bushel. It is vacation now. i expect to go to Dowagiac before school commences again. I shall have to stop for it is sprinkling and I have got to get the beans in write soon.

From Jimmy


[1] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford Betts

[2] Sarah’s son, Ethan Keith

[3] Sarah’s daughter, Hannah Keith

[4] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown

[5] Martha “Patty” (Keith) Sprague, sister of Sarah’s husband Luke

[6] Catherine (Keith) Bradley Lee, sister of Sarah’s husband Luke

[7] Hannah had been engaged to Eberly Underwood

[8] Daughter of George and Catherine (Keith) Bradley Lee

[9] Catherine Samantha “Kitty” Milham was born September 2, 1873

[10] Lucy’s husband, Martin Milham

[11] Sarah’s step-daughter. Lois was the daughter of Luke and Minerva (Payson) Keith

[12] Adelbert Skinner was Lois’ second husband

[13] Son of Sarah’s brother Edwin Crawford

[14] Eugene’s stepmother, Mary (Hamilton) Crawford

[15] Sarah’s youngest son, James Keith

[16] Ambrose Brown, Nancy (Keith) Brown’s father-in-law

November 26, 1861 letter to Sarah Keith and Lois Clark from Hiram Crawford Jr.

November 26, 1861

To: Sarah Keith and Lois Clark, Galesburg, MI

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Fort Monroe, Old Point Comfort, Hampton, VA

Hiram is describing to his sister and niece a horrendous storm that he encountered at Fort Hatteras following his retreat from Chicamacomico on Pamlico Sound. Following the storm, his Regiment received orders to move to Fortress Monroe near Hampton Roads, which is where he is writing his letter. He is receiving regular correspondence from his Mother and brother, Henry, but hasn’t heard from his brother, David, and fears he is no longer “of this world.”

Old Point Comfort VA
Fortress Monroe/Nov 26/61

Dear Sister & Lois[1]

Have about come to the conclusion that either, my last letter must have been miss _____ or else you have forgotten that such A person as your humble servant was in existance. If it is the first this will repair the lost, if the latter it will merely jog your memory a little. I have seen some pretty hard times “sogering” [soldiering] after getting cleaned out by the Rebels at Chicomocomico,[2] on the northern end of Hatteras Island, and losing about everything we had and lying in the sand almost wholly exposed to the inclemencies of the weather for about five weeks at Fort Hatteras. The Old Atlantic burst its boundaries and flooded us[3] out sweeping every thing we had left away. I will give A brief description of the latter.

Nov 5th early in the morning I was awakened by the cry of turn out, turn out or you will be drowned. I hustled out lively and took A look at things. I found the wind blowing A gale and the Ocean lashed to A fury and every moment forming floods over the Island. By seven oclock it had increased to such an extent that it broke through the Breastwork ½ mile in lenght that we had thrown up, which was between us and the Ocean, and come down on us in such force that swept Tents, clothing and in fact every thing except ourselves and Arms[?]. In order to save ourselves we had to pick the highest ground and then stand in water up to our knees exposed to A severe and chilly rain also the uncertainty of being swept in to the Sound (Pamblico) for four long hours. Not very pleasant feeling. I had to swim in order to save myself several times, and to cap the climax the day before we received some new clothes which we very much needed and about half of them were lost.

When I received orders to report ourselves to this place, embarked the same day and arrived here the next morning. The orders were received by A general feeling of joy by the whole Regmt which was not to be wondered at, for I think it is the most dreary, desolate, cheerless and God forsaken country, that A human being ever placed foot on. Since our arrival here we have undergone A great change both in appearance and feelings. We have received one whole suit of clothes from overcoat down to shoe strings and part of another, new Tents with stoves in them, two Blankets in fact we have abundance of everything and I believe we make a good appearance and will do as much execution, given us A chance, as any other Regmt in the service.

Week before last I was over and visited the ruins of Hampton, a Village situated 1½ miles from here, and burned by the Rebels seven months ago. It was the summer residence of the wealth and aristocracy of this part of Old Virginia, amongst which was Ex President John Tyler whose house was spared. I was all through it. It was splendidly furnished which is fast going to ruin under the rough treatment of the “Sogers” boys. The government is concentrating A large amount of troops at this point probably either to go down the coast or else to advance into centre of the state. I expect to see lot work before long. Well the sooner the better it will suit me. The Drum is beating the signal Lights out so I will close by sending my love to both of you, also to Luke[4] and Byron.[5] I wish [you would] write what has become of the Seely boys.[6] Have received letters regularly from Mother[7] & Henry.[8] Poor David[9] I feel very much worried about him. I am afraid we must count him amongst those that have passed the troubles of this world. My mind is on him A great deal, for he was my pet[?] Brother. If you should hear anything from him I wish you would let me know. Hoping you will answer on Receipt.

I remain
Ever your Brother
& Friend
H Crawford
2nd Sergt
Fortress Monroe
Virginia
Co E
20 Regmt Ind Vol

——-

[1] Lois (Keith) Clark was Sarah’s step-daughter

[2] In October 1861, Union forces established an outpost 40 miles north of Hatteras Inlet at Chicamacomico. When the Confederates discovered the Union presence in the village, they launched an attack on the troops there. When the Federal commander saw Confederate ships crossing Pamlico Sound, he ordered his men to flee south to Fort Hatteras

[3] The final storm of the 1861 hurricane season made landfall in eastern North Carolina and is believed to have attained hurricane intensity based on observations from Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina, and observations from the ship Honduras

[4] Luke Keith, Sarah’s husband

[5] Byron Clark, Lois’ husband

[6] See December 14, 1861 letter

[7] Nancy (Comfort) Crawford Betts

[8] Henry Clay Crawford, his older brother

[9] David Caleb (D. C.) Crawford, his older brother

May 23, 1856 letter to Sarah Keith from Nancy Crawford

Footnote #6 updated on 02-11-2017

May 23, 1856

To: Sarah Keith

From: Nancy Crawford, Cassville, WI

Arrived at Cassville on the Mississippi River in Wisconsin three weeks ago. Apparently staying with son James. Describes the area and also James and his family. Speaks of Eugene being quite sick. Asks Lois to write when she is going to marry Byron.

 1856-05-23 1856-05-23B 1856-05-23C 1856-05-23D

Cassvill May the 23 1856

Dear Sarah

We arived at Cassvill three weeks ago to day safe and sond and found James[1] and family the same. James looks quite natural. He is a vearry large stout man. Perty good looking. He has sandy wiskers, not quite so hevvy as Edwins[2]. His wife[3] is a verry good looking. She is bout Louesa bild, a verry little taller, verry fare blue eyes, lite chesnut brown hair. Thear children is large and fleshed for so yound as they be. The little girl[4] will be three years old the tweneth of next September and she [is] largear then your Nancy[5] and the boy[6] is one year old and he looks like a child two years old.

Edwin recommendation and pas that the Superitendent gave him past us all over raile and watter free. He thinks he can go to Roberts[7] without paying anything. He left hear the third day after we arrived hear and was a going to Roberts place and saide if he bought thear he wold rite to us in a few days and let us know all the perticulars. He had a grate ide of having James move thear if he bought and if not he was a going back to Hamelstons[8] and get Mary[9] and the houshold stuf and move out hear in this regeion of country to a place call Hastings and have James move with him but we havent heard from him cence he left. This is the resson that I delaid in riteing to you before.

Cassvill is a smoul town, quite a hamson location with scatterd housses and few good bildings in the loer end of the town, four stores, two publick houses, three groasses and som few bourding houses. It is on the Missippa river. Som of the bildings is close to the watter age. Cassvill is surrounded by mountains on south side of the river and iowa layes on the west side of the river. In some places the mountains is one hundred and thurty feet high. The hous we are aliving in is about thurty rods from the river. To morrow we expect to move in a hous that sets on the river edge. He [James] expects to stop thear tell he puts up one for themselves. He is a going to bild soon if he dont go with Edwin. James has traveled a grate deal sence he left us at Yorkvill[10]. He has ben to liverpool, round cape horn and to the east indes and to quebeck and Newyork City and broolin and a grate menny other places that is to leigus to menchen. He traveld betwen three and four years after he left home studdy. James has a unstiddy mind of his own fore ever to keep property after he earns it. He is indurstres, hard working fellow. I wish he could git with Robert in that kind of bissniss. I think he wold do better whare he cane have Roberts consol. I think he will hear [listen?] to him but I have no apinion of him going with Edwin, but still he may do well and I hope he may let him be whan he will for he has got a good kind wife and one that thinks evry thing of him and he is a good harted fellow as ever was.

Now Sarah I think I have told you all. Now dont split your sids a laughen when your reade this wen you see how I have blundert in the perticulars. James and family is well. I have a bad cold ever cence I have ben hear and a hard cough but I am som better of it now. Eugene[11] has the ague. He was verry sik yesterday. To day is his well day but he looks bad. He saide he wanted to go and see Eathen[12] and Nancy[13] but poor boy I dont know if he will ever have that oppertunity agane in his young days.

I cant tell you much about my self and and what I will do at present. I think now I will go back to Laport the first of July if the Lord spare my life. My things is thear. James and Ann wants me to stay longer if I can be contented. This place is settled mostly by dutch and a few irish and som americans and English. Rite as soon as you can. Give my respects to the old folks. My love to Luke[14] and youslef and the children, to Lous and Henry.[15] Tell Lous that she must rite to me when she and Byron[16] is a goen to git married[17] and get those verces from Miss Taylor and to put then in letter. James and Ann joins withe me in sending our love to you. No more at present but remain your afectunate Mother till death

Nancy B. Crawford

[to] Sarah C. Keith

N B give my respects to all inquirn frinds and rite evry peticulars.

N.B. Dear Sarah

The Missippa is a beatiful stream of water. It looks verry much like the river St. Clair only the water is soft and the cullar of rain water. The large boats is a runing up and down the river consinly. They engage six aday.

NBC

[1] James Crawford, Nancy’s son

[2] Edwin Crawford, Nancy’s son

[3] Ann (Rogers) Crawford

[4] Alice Crawford

[5] Nancy Keith, Nancy’s granddaughter (Sarah’s daughter)

[6] The baby’s name is unknown This was actually the second of three children born to James and Ann; name unknown. See notes below

[7] Robert Crawford, Nancy’s son

[8] Nancy is referring to the Hamiltons, Edwin’s in-laws

[9] Edwin Crawford’s wife

[10] When the family moved to Michigan from Canada, they lost contact with James, who apparently went his own way while the family was living in Yorkville, Michigan (about 1846). See 9-16-1851 letter where they are trying to find the whereabouts of James. This is apparently the first time Nancy has seen James since he left

[11] Edwin Crawford’s son by his first wife, Louisa Hall

[12] Sarah Keith’s son, Ethan Keith

[13] Nancy Keith, Sarah’s daughter

[14] Charles Luke Keith Jr., Sarah’s husband

[15] Lois and Henry were Luke’s children by his first wife, Minerva Payson

[16] Byron Clark

[17] Lois and Byron were married March 17, 1859

Additional note added on 08-09-2015 regarding Footnote #6 above. It is possible that this was another child who died in childhood. According to this letter, James and Ann had two children: the “little girl will be three years old the tweneth of next September and she [is] largear then your Nancy and the boy is one year old and he looks like a child two years old.” If that boy was Rollin (nicknamed Rolla), he would have been born around 1855, yet according to census records, Rollin was born around 1857 or 1858. Perhaps another boy was born to James and Ann who then died before Ann did in 1858. If Rollin was born in 1857/58, then possibly Ann died from complications of the birth.

Correction added on 10-18-2015: According to the obituary for Alice Crawford, “she was the last surviving member of a family of three children.” This confirms that Rollin was born in 1857/58 and that there was another boy born to James and Ann around 1855 and that that boy died before Ann did in 1858.