December 1, 1920 letter to Nancy Brown from Ethan Keith

December 1, 1920 

To: Nancy Brown

From: Ethan Keith, Kalamazoo, MI

Ethan has received word from his sister of his Uncle Hiram’s death. He is expressing sadness that “… we will not see him again in this life. It’s hard to think of. He has always been so good to all of us. I am very sorry for Aunt Kate, and the children.” Hiram’s death followed closely those of Uncle Pros and Aunt Virginia, both of whom died during the year. Hannah has been sick and suffers from lack of appetite.


Kalamazoo, Dec 1. 1920.
8.15 P.m.

Dear Sister and all,

I have just been using the battery. Hannah[1] used it before I did, and Lou[2] is using now so should think there ought to be some lightning around here now. Thought I had better tell you I sent two bushels of Green Mountain potatoes to you to day. You know they are a later and harder potato than the Hebrons are not quite as tender. If you all like them, and would care for any more, will send as many more when the weather is favorable. Remember they are paid for.

So Uncle Hiram[3] is gone, and we will not see him again in this life. I’ts hard to think of. He has always been so good to all of us. I am very sorry for Aunt Kate,[4] and the children they will miss him so much. He followed Uncle Pross[5] and Aunt Virginia[6] pretty close. I would not be surprised to hear Uncle Henry[7] had gone any time.

Hannah says tell you she will write to you as soon as she can. She has been pretty sick since she had that chill. Does not improve very fast. If she could eat but she has no appetite. Lou[8] has written the Dr. and perhaps he will be able to do something for it. I hope Lou[9] is improving but I believe he has got to be careful and not overdo.

LaVerne[10] and Louese expect to come down friday P.m. and stay until Sunday, expect she is agoing to do something in the front part of the house.

I have twenty shocks tied into bundles ready to draw in and that will leave twenty-four in the field. Dont know when I will get the twenty-four in for I will have so much to husk out before there would be room in the barn for them.

Will stop and go to bed. Give our sympathy to Aunt Kate and family.

Love to all,

Ethan

——-

[1] Ethan’s and Nancy’s sister, Hannah (Keith) Towne

[2] Ethan’s and Nancy’s sister, Louese (Keith) Harris

[3] Hiram Crawford Jr. died November 29, 1920 in Chicago, Illinois

[4] Hiram’s wife, Katherine (Atcheson) Crawford

[5] Their uncle, Lucius Prosper Crawford, who died in Berkeley, California on March 4, 1920

[6] Their uncle Henry Clay Crawford’s wife, Virginia (Worley) Crawford, who died July 18, 1920 in South Bend, Indiana

[7] Their uncle, Henry Clay Crawford

[8] Believe he is referring to their sister Louese

[9] Believe this is referring to Louis Mueller, Nancy’s son-in-law, who was hit by a streetcar and suffered brain damage

[10] LaVerne (Harris) Boyer, sister Louese’s daughter

June 17, 1920 letter to Nancy Brown from Kate Crawford

June 17, 1920

To: Nancy Brown, Kalamazoo, MI

From: Kate Crawford, Chicago, IL

Kate writes that they are a good ways off from being settled. The bottom fell out of the money bag, so she and Hiram must wait. Tomorrow is Taylor’s & Helen’s 15th birthday and next Thursday night they graduate. She expects to witness the ceremony and then the aunts and uncles and cousins will repair to the house and all talk at once and eat ice cream and cake. They are going to give Taylor a watch and Nell had given Harry a diamond stick pin before they were married and they have had it set in a ring for Helen. Hiram bought Taylor a real leather belt with monogramed sterling buckle. All these various things coming along is the reason they cannot get settled.

5412 Underwood Ave

6-17-20

Dear Nan

I am sitting in the gloaming and thought I would draft you a line or two to let you know we were here as yet. I hardly need tell you about the weather. I fancy there is not much difference between this place & yours. It was so in L.M.[1] What ever we were there, I knew it was about the same here. There was a radical change last night and today it has been uncomfortably cold. Papa[2] started for down town & he was so cold he came back and changed his underwear. Jessie[3] went to work yesterday and that leaves Papa and I alone and I find the work exceeds the cottage. I am so glad I had three quiet years. I wish I had enjoyed them even more. Jessie has to leave at half past six & I get up and help her and about the time she is gone, K[4] comes on the scene so I am up about an hour. Then I lie down but seldom sleep. I am almost as much of a stranger as if I had never lived here. I do not go out much. I have been down town twice, to a funeral in Rogers Park, a lady 70 years old I knew when she was a girl, and out to Mr Dewey’s in R.P. one evening. We are a good ways off from being settled. The bottom kind of fell out of the money bag, so we must wait. Tomorrow is Taylor & Helen’s 15th birthday[5] and next Thursday night they graduate. We are expected to witness the ceremony and then the Aunts & Uncles & cousins will repair to the house and all talk at once and eat ice cream and cake. They are going to give Taylor a watch & Nell[6] had given Harry[7] a diamond stick pin before they were married and they have had it set in a ring for Helen. Papa bought Taylor a real leather belt with monogram sterling buckle. All these various things coming along is the reason we cannot get settled. We thought we would get H[elen] a camasole, so Papa said. Now Jessie Saturday aft– you go and get the carousal for Helen. We had quite a laugh over it. We have not seen or heard from Lela.[8] We have no phone service as yet. The landlady is real good. Anyone who has her number calls there for us. She touches our bell and then they can use this phone, but no one can call us here. The man emptied the box this morning of the last tenant’s nickles and he said they were up against it every where.

The prospect for canning is very poor. We had to stop buying berries they were so poor & so high. Potatoes way out of sight. We used to say to people we invited to dine with us (they would say don’t do a lot of work for us) & we would reply – oh we will just drop two or three extra potatoes in the pot. But now, nothing doing. I hope Hannah[9] is feeling better now you are there. I tell you it is lovely for anyone who has a garden. Oh how I miss L.M. Plenty of everything. Milk & cream 12 cts instead of 15 & 16, ice box filled to overflowing, plenty of eggs. We got 12 doz four weeks ago from Leroy’s. Almost gone now. We could get lots of fruit & fresh vegetables. When you are enjoying all these luxuries, just think of us.

I had a nice letter from Laura[10] a few days ago. She is very lonely. Mays husband[11] sprained his ankle just after L.P.[12] passed away and was confined to the house about three weeks. Did you know Leo & his wife[13] were separated?

You can hardly imagine how different it is here from L.M. Last Saturday I listened to pianos of all grades, victrolas, Auto horns, babies crying and sundry other sounds. Not agreable to any ears, but who am I in this motley crowd. If you get the Chicago news, you must be startled with the killings going on and 9 out of 10, a woman at the bottom of it. The last time I heard from M[14] she was getting along. She had to have two or three stitches. Baby was a fine healthy fellow.[15] She had plenty of milk, which is a great blessing. When she was in the hospital, she wrote to her mother[16] & it did not reach her, but was returned. She wrote on the envelope, see what Jack[17] did, directed it wrong. He wrote under it, could not help it, so excited at being a father, Jack.

I am sorry you are going to be gone all summer. I am very lame at times. It is with difficulty I can get around and to add to my joy, the middle finger of my right hand has been crippled with rheumatism, but is so now I can use my hand. Now I have told you all my ills. And it seems by the way my eyes feel it is bed time so I will close by sending love to all from all and hoping to hear from you soon.

Aunt Kate

Got muddled with the paper

[1] Lake Mills, WI where Kate and Hiram had had a summer cottage

[2] Hiram Crawford Jr.

[3] Jessie (Crawford) Eck, Kate’s daughter

[4] Katherine Louesa Eck, Kate’s granddaughter

[5] The twin children of Harry and Nellie (Sullivan) Crawford and Kate’s grandchildren

[6] Kate’s daughter–in-law

[7] Harry Crawford, Kate’s son

[8] Lela (Brown) Mueller, Nancy’s daughter

[9] Hannah (Keith) Towne, Nancy’s sister

[10] Laura (Hands) Blake Crawford, the second wife of Lucius Prosper Crawford, Hiram’s brother

[11] Believe she is referring to James MacDermott, the husband of her daughter, Laura May (Blake) MacDermott

[12] Lucius Prosper “Pros” Crawford, who died in Berkeley, California on March 4, 1920

[13] Pros’ son, Leo Crawford, and Ella (Drew) Crawford

[14] Kate’s granddaughter, Marian (Eck) Meiss

[15] Jack Meiss Jr., Marian’s son

[16] Jessie (Crawford) Eck

[17] Jack Meiss, Marian’s husband

Obituary of Lucius Prosper (“Pros”) Crawford

Pros died May 4, 1920. The following obituary is from the May 5, 1920 edition of The Oakland (California) Tribune.

Crawford, Prosper - Death Notice

January 4, 1902 letter to Sarah Keith from Robert Crawford

January 4, 1902

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Robert Crawford, Neenah, WI

Robert is writing Sarah to see how she is getting along. He has not heard from Henry or Hiram recently, but understood that Prosper had remarried.

1902-01-04 Robert Crawford to Sarah Keith

Neenah Jan 4″ 1902

Dear Sister Sarah

I have not heard from you in some time and thought that I would write you a few lines this morning. I am usually well, but cough some yet. Dont expect to get much better till some time in the Spring. Edna[1] and family are usually well, but she has a cold. Feels better this morning. I have not heard from Hiram[2] in quite a while. I dont suppose that Kate[3] has returned yet. I would like to know how they were. I must write to Hiram. Well Sister dear, how do you get along. I hope that you are no worse or Luke[4]. I had an opportunity to go in to the Pinery to locate logs, but declined and thought it best for me to stay near the fire this winter.

I just wrote to Mrs Lou Harris[5]. Hope they are well. I wrote Nancy[6] about the time they were moving from Hoyne ave[7] but have not heard from her. I want you Sarah to send me her address when you write me. I wrote to Henry[8] about Thanksgiving but have not heard from him. L.P.C.[9] I suppose has jumped the Broom Stick[10] by what I have heard. Incidentally now there will be a chance for Belle[11] if that is the case. Sister, I for one dont blame him though I think that Pros was not perfection by any means. With regards & love to you and yours. I remain your affectionate Brother.

Robt Crawford

——-

[1] Edna (Crawford) Henry Tullar, Robert’s daughter

[2] Their brother, Hiram Crawford Jr.

[3] Katherine (Atcheson) Crawford, Hiram’s wife

[4] Charles Luke Keith Jr., Sarah’s husband

[5] Sarah’s daughter, Louese (Keith) Harris

[6] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown

[7] 736 North Hoyne Avenue in Chicago, Illinois

[8] Their brother, Henry Clay Crawford

[9] Their youngest brother, Lucius Prosper Crawford, who went by the nickname of Pros

[10] Pros married Laura Hands September 30, 1901

[11] Pros’ first wife, Isabella (Steele) Crawford. She and Pros divorced sometime around 1900

(This post was updated on 05-06-2021)

May 15, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Jr.

May 15, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Chicago, IL

Hiram is responding to Sarah’s news of D.C.’s death. He had sent a letter to Robert and had received a copy of D.C.’s obituary from Henry. He has sent condolences to Amanda.

Scan of 1901-05-15 Hiram Crawford to Sarah Keith

Anthracite-Bituminous Coal Co.
Miners and Dealers in Coal.

Chicago, May 15, 1901

My Dear Sister

Your letter with the sad news of our Brothers death[1] reached me Saturday morning. It was a great shock to me for somehow I hadent thought of DC passing away. He was a strong active man and was comparatively young amongst old people. I feel it probably more than the rest of the boys for we being so near the same age.[2] All during our boyhood and young manhood when we could be together we were very chummy. He ought to have lived ten or fifteen years longer and undoubtedly would if he had taken care of himself. No one ought to fool with the grip[3] or pneumonia. When he does he practically commits suicide. Well, Sarah, our circle has been broken for the first time in a good many years.[4] We have stood at a half of a dozen for a good while. May we stand at five[5] for many years yet. But we are like the grand army. We are at that age when we must expect these events to naturally happen a little oftener. It is the fate of the human family and we must take it as it comes and as philosophical as we can.

I wrote to Amanda[6] as soon as I got your letter expressing my condolences and sympathy as best I could and asked her to write. I also wrote Robert.[7] Amanda must have sent Henry[8] a paper and perhaps written him for I received a South Bend paper with the obituary in exactly as it was in the Denver paper you sent me, which by the way I gave to Nancy[9] last Sunday. I shall however write Henry today and send him Amanda’s letter with directions to return it to you. We are all as well as usual. Received a letter from Blanche[10] yesterday. She was well and happy. I mail you some chop today. Please let me know if you receive it. Love to all

Affectionately your Brother

H Crawford

215 Dearborn St

——-

[1] David Caleb Crawford, who went by the nickname of D.C.

[2] Hiram was two years younger than D.C.

[3] Grippe, another name for mild influenza which was an upper respiratory infection caused by a virus and associated with running nose, sore throat and cough, temperature elevation and aches and pains throughout the body

[4] Their brother James died in 1858 and brother Edwin died in 1866

[5] Sarah, Robert, Henry, Hiram and Prosper

[6] Amanda (Thornton) Crawford, D.C.’s wife

[7] Their brother, Robert Crawford

[8] Their brother, Henry Clay Crawford

[9] Sarah’s daughter, Nancy (Keith) Brown

[10] Hiram’s youngest daughter, Blanche (Crawford) Hessey

(This post was updated on 02-18-2021)

May 5, 1901 letter to Sarah Keith from Amanda Crawford

May 5, 1901

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Amanda Crawford, Golden, CO

Amanda is writing to Sarah to inform her of D.C.’s death and the circumstances leading up to it.

Scan of 1901-05-05 Amanda Crawford to Sarah Keith

Golden, May 5th

My dear Sister and Brothers,

My heart is to heavy to say much but I am in duty bound to tell you of my loss. My husband is dead.[1] He has been sick with bad cold for some six weeks, was home most of the time for last three weeks but would not give up and was in Denver all of the last week attending to his business affairs. I tried to have him come home but he said he was not sick enough. I was with him evry other day and heard from him evry day. He would not go to bed and I did not realize how bad he was. I was with him all day on Monday and Tuesday he expected to return to Cripple Creak, but did not and on Tuesday evening sent for me and I went down on early train expecting him to meet me, but as he did not I went to his room and found my darling unconscious. He revived and knew me once or twice but did not know Ida.[2] We were both with him all day until the end. I had left Harold[3] at home and he did not know of his father’s death until next day. Oh, how can I ever stand it. My poor darling. We loved each other so and he always lived for and loved his little family. As I do not know the address of either of the boys[4] so please forward this letter to them or let them know of their Brother’s death. Ida has sent the papers to you also. My poor dear husband is at rest and sleeps by the side of his two little babies Allie and Mamie[5] at Riverside Denver.

In sorrow,

Your Sister

Amanda

——-

[1] David Caleb (D.C.) Crawford, was 65 years old at the time of his death on May 1, 1901

[2] Ida Louise (Crawford) Kelly, Amanda’s daughter

[3] Harold “Doc” Crawford, Amanda’s son

[4] D.C. had four brothers still living at the time of his death: Robert, Henry, Hiram and Lucius Prosper “Pros” Crawford

[5] Both daughters died in early childhood

(This post was updated on 02-13-2021)

June 2, 1882 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Jr.

June 2, 1882

To: Sarah Keith

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Chicago, IL

They sold their home and are looking for a place to live. Kate wants to go home in the summer. Prosper and family are living at 3750 Dearborn. Wants to know if Henry and D.C. send her money regularly.

1882-06-02

V.C. Turner, Pres’t                                    H. Crawford, Treas.
North Chicago City Railway Co.
Office, 430 North Clark Street,

Chicago, June 2nd, 1882

Dear Sister

This is another miserable rainy day but they are so common that we have about given up hope of having any other kind. One half pleasant day to a week bad is about the average.

We sold our home last Tuesday and am now looking around for some place to live. Houses are scarce and rents are high. And as Kate[1] intends to go home[2] sometime this summer we think of boarding until fall if we can find quarters.

Prosper[3] and family are living at 3750 Dearborn St. They have four boarders beside Bell’s[4] father & mother.[5] He has got steady work in a ____________, so I guess they will get along. Enclosed find five doll. Does Henry[6] & D.C.[7] send their remittences regular. With love,

Your Brother,

H. Crawford

——-

[1] Hiram’s wife, Katherine (Atcheson) Crawford

[2] Since Kate was born in Ogdensburg, New York, presume that is where Hiram is referring

[3] Lucius Prosper Crawford, Hiram’s youngest brother

[4] Pros’ wife, Isabella (Steele) Crawford

[5] Joseph and Eliza (Knox) Steele

[6] Henry Crawford, Hiram’s brother

[7] David Caleb Crawford, Hiram’s brother

April 24, 1882 letter to Sarah Keith from Louese Harris

April 24, 1882

To: Sarah Keith

From: Louese Harris, Phoenix, MI

 Louese Harris is describing their trip to their new home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by way of Chicago, shortly after her marriage to Daniel (D.D.) Harris.

1882-04-24 1882-04-24B 1882-04-24C 1882-04-24D

***March 16, 2019 – This is an updated version of the letter that was originally posted on October 11, 2015***

Phoenix Apr 24/82

Dear Ma

After leaving Galesburg[1] arrived at Kal[2] waited for the express come through to Chicago. Found no one at the depot. Went up to Uncle Hi’s[3], found them expecting us. Rec’d the postal that afternoon. They were very much surprised to hear that we could not stay longer than Wed eve. Jess, Lil & Ida Hudson spent the afternoon with me. Ida & I called on Carrie Stray. Walt came down after work & he & Jess stayed to tea then went to the depot with us. Will & Joe Hayward called a few moments.

Got my album it was all right. Uncle Hi invited D[4] to go to dinner with him that day so he did not get back to see the girls until four o’clock. Did not see Uncle Pros[5] or any of his family. He is running on the cable now. Aunt Bell[6] & the children[7] are going to Omro[8] to live in their house they own there. (We rec’d no presents there.) Aunt Kate[9] said if I had told them just when I was going to be married[10] they would have sent me something. We left Chicago Wed eve at 9.5. arrived at Ishpeming the next after noon at 2.30. Put up at the Nelson house which affords first class accommodations. It is a nicer looking building than any hotels in Kal.

Ishpeming is a pleasant place & lively. Left there Friday morn at 8 o’clock. Arrived to L’anse just before noon. Had to stay there until Sat morning then took the stage for Houghton. We were from 8 in the morning until 6 at night getting through. Of all the roads I ever saw those were the worst. The wheels were into the mud up to the hubs half of the time. If it was’nt mud it was water or sand. Thought we’d tip over every minute. Part of the time we would ride around rocks where it would be right straight up on one side & down hundreds of ft. on the other. I’d think of home when we come to such places. Well we got through all right. Staid at Hancock over night. Han– & Houghton are beautiful places. The river only divides them. There are as nice residences there as they have in Kal on their prettiest street and it is so full of business every one is on the go. Left Hancock yesterday morning by rail road. Arrived at Calumet at 1.30 then came over there by stage. Part of the way we rode over fearful large snow drifts then again the road would be bare. There is scarcely no snow here at Phoenix only a few spots on the cliffs. We got here yesterday after one I believe. Of course they were all glad to see us. Can’t tell how I’ll like the Brockways[11] but think I’ll like Albert[12] & Mrs Scott.[13] We have a room up stairs in Mrs Scott’s house. I’ve been over to the store twice to day. They have a nice store frame building & a good stock of goods. Brock– house is furnished quite well but no upholstered furniture excepting a couch & lounging chair. They keep a girl. She has done my washing to day. The boys turned up last night to let us know that they would be on hand to night so I expect we’ll have a homing. I’m going home with Bess Farwell to get away from it. Do not know whether D will come up or not. My trunk looks very bad. They knocked a hole in the top of it & it is banged up all over. Does not look very much like my trunk.

Sallie (Mrs Scott) gave me a silk tidy[14] this morning. It is real pretty. Will tell you how it is made in my next. Hav’nt been homesick yet but know I shall be[15]. Good Bye. Write soon

——-

[1] Louese’s husband, D.D. Harris, was a merchant and they were moving from Galesburg, Michigan up to Phoenix, Michigan, where he would work in the store owned by the Brockways; Lucena (Harris) Brockway was his father’s sister

[2] Kalamazoo, Michigan

[3] Hiram Crawford Jr.

[4] Louese’s husband, Daniel D. Harris Jr., who was referred to as D.D. or D.

[5] Lucius Prosper Crawford

[6] Pros’ wife, Isabella (Steele) Crawford

[7] Leo, Byron, Ernest and Albert Crawford

[8] Omro, Wisconsin

[9] Hiram’s wife, Katherine (Atcheson) Crawford

[10] They were married April 12, 1882

[11] Daniel & Lucena (Harris) Brockway

[12] Albert Brockway, Daniel & Lucena’s son

[13] Sarah “Sallie” (Brockway) Scott, Daniel & Lucena’s daughter

[14] A tidy could be either a decorative protective covering for the arms or headrest of a chair or a receptacle that holds odds and ends (as sewing materials)

[15] Apparently Louese cried every night and after just 18 months, they moved to Shelbyville, Michigan, which was closer to her family, where D.D. opened a general store and also served as postmaster

February 2, 1882 letter to Sarah Keith from Hiram Crawford Jr.

February 2, 1882

To: Sarah Keith, Galesburg, MI

From: Hiram Crawford Jr., Chicago, IL

Kate has been suffering with neuralgia in the head. The last time Hiram saw Prosper, he was well, although they don’t see each other very often. “It has been quite a fall for them but he seems to take it quite philosophically.” Edna Allen and her husband and daughter visited them about two weeks ago.

1882-02-02 1882-02-02env

V.C. Turner, Pres’t.                             H. Crawford, Treas.
North Chicago City Railway Co.
Office, 430 North Clark Street,

Chicago, Feb 2nd 1882

Dear Sister

This letter leaves us all in pretty good shape with the exception of Kate[1] who has for the past two weeks and is now suffering with neuralgia in the head, caused by a bad cold. She gets better one day and is worse the next. The last time I saw LP[2] they were all well. They live in such an out of the way place that we dont see each other very often. It has been quite a fall for them but he seems to take it quite philosophically. The rest of our family I know nothing about. I forgot that Edna Allen[3], husband & daughter[4] made us a visit spending the day and evening with us about two weeks ago. Everything appeard to be lively. Enclosed find five (5) doler.

Love to all

Your Brother

H Crawford

——-

[1] Katherine (Atcheson) Crawford, Hiram’s wife

[2] Lucius Prosper Crawford, Hiram’s younger brother

[3] Edna (Crawford) Allen, daughter of Hiram’s late brother Edwin and Mary (Hamilton) Crawford

[4] Oscar Allen and Madge Allen, who was about 2-1/2 years old

Spring 1879 letter to Sarah Keith from Nancy Brown

This letter has been moved to Spring 1877 as it fits in better with the surrounding letters.

 

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